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Sample introduction email to client

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Sample introduction email to client
August 30, 2018 Anniversary Wishes For Parents 5 comments

How to introduce yourself in an email, how to write the message, subject lines, greetings, closings, and examples of formal and casual email introductions.

In this article, we set out to explore how you can win your prospects’ trust from the very first email. We also go one step further by giving you some business introduction email samples which you can slightly adjust and send to your potential clients.

The first time I sent cold business introduction emails I failed spectacularly!

I was not aware of the term “Spam” and I quickly discovered that no one likes to receive emails without permission.

As you can imagine, it did not feel good to be rejected.

However, this experience forced me to explore proper email marketing practices and to read more about GDPR and anti-spam policies.

Ever since these “humble beginnings”, I have realized that sending personalized and well-researched emails always pays off.

As a result, most of the emails I sent were embraced by their readers, most of whom replied without the need to send a follow-up.

Adding to that, some of these recipients turned into leads and, a short while later, into paying clients.

But for that to happen, you need to write A LOT of emails, improve your writing skills, use many different subject lines and test multiple email structures.

So, in this post, I will outline the exact steps you need to take to write great introduction emails to the businesses you want to connect with.

I will also share with you our top business introduction email samples that you can use for your next campaign.

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Step 1: Create a List of Prospects

Your prospecting method is what is going to make you stand out from the crowd.

Gone are the days where you could create cold outreach campaigns from a list of emails you “extracted” from Linkedin.

Not only is it disrespectful to send unsolicited emails, but it is also considered spam.

And much like your prospects, we too have zero tolerance for spam.

For that reason, prospecting can become a lengthy (but rewarding) process.


In order to succeed in your cold emailing efforts, you will have to send ULTRA personalized emails.

Not only that, but you will have to do a lot of prior background research on your prospect and find a way to get their permission to send the email.

So how do you do that? The secret is to find and talk with people who happen to know your prospect.

To give you an idea, you need to find people who have a low degree of separation (also known as bacon number) from the person you want to reach out to. So look within your extended network and try to discover links that can tie you together.

So how do you find the perfect prospects to reach out to?

Follow the steps outlined below.

1. Choose a niche and create segments

When it comes to finding a niche, try to be as specific as possible. Try to find common ground by showing empathy with their problem and giving them solutions.

A $10M/year business will not have the same needs as a new startup.

The same is true for different industries.

By knowing what your prospect needs, you will be able to write a great one-on-one email.

2. How to Choose Your Niche

Choosing a niche is a very important step in the process.

Having a clear understanding of your recipient’s industry can set you apart from your competition and adds to the authority you have in their space.

Start by doing some research on an under-served niche that you can help with your skillset. There must be a few industries where your experience can be used as an “unfair” advantage.

After selecting a niche, you will need to create a spreadsheet where you segment your prospects based on demographics, revenue, audience, and other, more specific needs.

For example, you may have an agency that offers email marketing services to fashion-related e-commerce stores.

This is quite specific to be considered as a niche and you can go in even more detail. Here is how you can further segment your findings:

      • Established e-commerce stores (5+ years and/or $5M+ in yearly revenues)
      • New e-commerce stores (< 1 year in business)
      • One person business e-commerce stores
      • Funded e-commerce stores

On top of that, a good way to manage your prospect list is to use Google Sheets. Simply create one column for all your prospects and add columns with segmentation criteria.

3. Find Target Businesses

Now that you have a niche and several segments, it’s time to narrow down the businesses you want to contact. The following resources can be used to filter companies that could be in a need for your services:

  • Angel.co or F6S for startups 
  • CrunchBase (also a great option for startups)
  • Social media (Twitter, Instagram, Facebook)
  • Software directories such as Capterra and
  • ProductHunt for finding product-focused startups.

These are just a few ways to get you started.

Of course, depending on your niche, this list may look a lot different. Therefore, it is important that you do your due diligence beforehand.

Once you discover a potential prospect, add them to the spreadsheet you created and see which segment they belong to.

4. Find Contact Information

Finally, you will have to find a way to contact your prospect in a legal and spam-free manner.

4.1 An introduction to Spam and why it can hurt your company.

Spam stands for any email that is sent to someone without their permission. And while getting permission to send an email can be difficult, it is certainly in your best interests to do so, both for yourself and for your company.

So, in short, an email is considered “spam” if:

  • The recipient’s personal identity and context are irrelevant because you send emails in bulk.
  • The recipient has not given their permission for an email to be sent.

Therefore, and because your business will always be better off if you manage to secure a white-listed status with internet providers, you should take this issue very seriously.

4.2 Finding the best email addresses

Sending an email to a “contact page” email address, such as [email protected] or [email protected] may initially seem like a bad idea.

However, if the message gets forwarded to the individual it is addressed to, you automatically receive permission to reach out.

Therefore, you might be able to reach a decision-maker within the company even without having someone in your network to put you in contact with the right person.

For large businesses, this may be a smart idea, since decision-makers often work in a different branch of the company and are completely unrelated to any of your business contacts.

For smaller businesses, on the other hand, you could first look through your network and see if there is anyone with ties to the founders. If they do, you could ask for an introduction. If not, you can always send your first email to their contact page.

Step 2: Develop a Unique Value Proposition

Unless you are the Wolf of Wall Street, it will be hard to sell your services to companies that don’t really need them.

Therefore, it is important to understand your prospect’s needs before pitching your services.

If you did your prospecting right (Step 1), you will have a good understanding of the general challenges your potential clients are facing.

This knowledge comes from the experience you have with their niche.

As a result, you can now develop a unique value proposition that fits each segment you reach out to.

Doing so will help you go from a generalized approach – “grow your company’s exposure” – to a more specific and time-bound offer – “grow your email list by 5000 people within 2 months.

You can start by performing some research in each of your segments.

Try to find:

  • Technical issues that you can solve for them.
  • Digital marketing shortcomings in case you offer marketing services.
  • Inexperienced mistakes: These are mistakes where a business attempts to do something you specialize in, but do not have enough experience to do so in a professional manner. For example, a business that sends weekly newsletters that are not good –  bad Subject lines, or copy that does not speak to the target audience.
  • Industry-specific issues depending on a company’s size and product type. For example, certain topics cannot be advertised using Google ads while other topics can easily be misinterpreted.

If, for example, you want to attract “New e-commerce stores”, you can research and find what these businesses really need:

  • Increase their sales by 20% MoM
  • Grow the email list to 10.000 subscribers
  • Or maybe increase customer lifetime value by 10%

Now, assuming you have an email marketing service business, you can help new e-commerce stores build a mailing list so they can start selling their product.

If, on the other hand, you reach out to more established businesses, you might offer a month-over-month service that focuses on optimizing conversion rate and, as a result, sales.

These are two examples of different segments within one niche. And every segment has different needs.

Step 3: Write a killer Subject line

The subject line is, hands down, the most important part of your email.

If you fail to cause curiosity – no one will read your email:

  • If the Open Rate % is low – your Subject line is not eye-catching
  • If the Open Rate % is high – you wrote an awesome Subject line

And if you are interested to know how to get your emails opened, here’s the secret to high open rates:

1. Use personalized subject lines

The ability to create highly personalized emails plays an important role when it comes to your open rates. One study discovered that adding personalization elements to an email and its subject line can improve its open rates by as much as 42%.

Usually, a good way to write a personalized Subject line is by writing compact sentences that convey the purpose of your message and/or service.

Subject lines for a Contact Pages get very creative:

  • “1 year in business – 100 more ahead?”
  • “Found the missing puzzle piece?”
  • “I discovered a small mistake”
  • “This trick will set you apart”
  • “50% growth in 6 months – are you up for it?”
  • “You need Email Marketing!”
  • “Hey [company], let’s grow?”
  • “[company] without Me = Soldier without a weapon”
  • “Lookin’ for some [job title]?”
  • “I noticed [company’s] looking for a [job title]”

Subject lines for emails you send to people you’ve met in real life need creativity as well. However, you can personalize them further, depending on how you met your contact.

General subject lines for people you recently met:

    • “About our recent discussion”
    • “It’s [first name & last name] from yesterday”
    • “The business proposal we discussed”

Subject lines for people you met at a conference:

  • “Great meeting you at [conference name]”
  • “The most interesting conversation from [conference name]”
  • “Full inbox after [conference name]?”

Subject lines for people you met at a meetup (more relaxed tone):

  • “It’s [first name], we met at [meetup name]”
  • “Great chatting with you at [meetup name]”
  • “Post-[meetup name] business”

Subject lines for people you met at a work dinner

  • “Always good to talk business over food”
  • “Let’s pick up where we left yesterday”
  • “The one thing I learned from [restaurant name]”

Subject lines for people you never met but have permission to reach out to (through your network)

  • “One quick question as promised”
  • “It’s [first name & last name] from yesterday”
  • “The business proposal [friend’s name] mentioned”

2. Be Straightforward

It may come as a surprise to many, but being direct is one of the best copywriting hacks in your toolbox.

Straightforward subject lines work because your reader already knows what you want to talk about without ever reading the body of your email.

Therefore, it is easier and less time consuming for them to make a decision.

This approach is especially effective for emailing busy people (founders, executives, etc.).

The drawback of this method is that if your unique value proposition is not strong or clear enough, your recipient will lose interest and delete your message.

Therefore, in order to make the most from your subject line, describe your unique value proposition in only a few words.

Example for business contacts:

“Here’s the case study we discussed”

“The marketing hack I told you about”

“The information I promised you”

Example for contact pages:

“I’ll help you turn subscribers into screaming fans”

“Capture more leads from your blog”

“Email marketing help?”

3. Add curiosity – The secret to high Open Rates

This approach taps into the recipient’s emotions by inducing curiosity.

Hence to make your readers curious, try to create subject lines with somewhat incomplete information:

“That’s done”

“Quick tip”

“A 3-minute favor?”

These subject lines don’t give away a lot of information, which is exactly why it works. If they want to find out what the “3-minute favor” is all about, they’ll have to actually read the email.

As with everything else, testing is the key to success. Experiment with different ideas to discover what works best for your segment. Every industry, every niche, every segment is different. Once you find what works, you can use it repeatedly.

4. Tailor your greeting to the industry and situation

If you reach the greeting part then your subject line did the hard part.

Next step is to greet your reader properly.

Now it’s important to remember that greetings are different depending on the industry:

  • “Dear Mr. Johnson” – For rather conservative industries, such as universities, banking, government, and financial institutions, it is best to address the reader in a more formal way.
  • “Dear Sir or Madam”, “To Whom It May Concern” – When you are trying to reach out to a company and you don’t know the name of the person you are addressing, this could be a good way to greet someone formally.
  • “Hi”, “Hello”, “Hey”, “Hello James,” – This is today’s most common way of addressing someone in emails. Across all industries in which formality is not an issue, you will be best off starting out with a simple “hello”.

Note: When reaching out to a business through a contact page for the first time always be polite and well-spoken. If you make an effort to come over as a likable person, getting a reply will be a lot easier.

With the perfect subject line and your greetings dialed, it’s now time to create the actual email.

Step 4: Create Your Business Introduction Emails

You can approach email in three different ways:

  • A personalized approach, which essentially means that you customize your emails for each business differently.
  • Templated approach, where you use an existing template to your whole segment without personalization elements.

While personalized emails are meant to be used one-on-one emails, a templated approach can also serve you well.

This is because, with email templates, you can adjust parts of the email to add elements of personalization.

Here’s what I mean by that:

  • You can change the name of the person you are addressing the email to.
  • You can replace the name of the company within the email.
  • You can adjust traffic data and other information that relates to your prospect’s problem and/or solution.

 

Therefore don’t be afraid to test some templates as well!

Next, let’s talk about your introduction.

1. How to introduce yourself in an email

I’ll let you in on a little secret…

If you are reaching out to a contact page, you don’t have to introduce yourself.

Mindblown?

Many people still believe that it is important for them to describe themselves, what they do, the job role and write long paragraphs that do nothing to help the prospect.

This will quickly turn your emails into a boring chunk of text.

Instead, try to only write things that add value to your reader.

You can introduce yourself later on.

While it is necessary for the reader to know who you are, it is not the most important thing in the email you are sending.

So, write just one sentence that packs everything the reader should know about you.

“My name is XYZ and I am CEO of YVZ.”

This is a simple and powerful intro.

If your company’s name does not reflect your offer, you may want to add 2 more words to explain what type of services you offer.

On the other hand, when you are sending an email to a (potential) business contact it might be a good idea to introduce yourself at the beginning of your email, together with a quick reminder on how you two met.

For example, if you are reaching out to a prospect you met at a networking event, after receiving his business card, you can introduce yourself as follows:

“Hey [first name], its [your name]. We met at [event name] yesterday after you mentioned that my hat looked funny.”

It’s always best to remind the prospect of how he met you or what your relationship is. This way, when they read through your email, they will easily remember how they know you.

2. Create a world-class business introduction email

The body of your email – is not as important as you think.

If you spent enough time researching your prospects and creating a strong value proposition, you can get great results even with a couple of short paragraphs.

Plenty of companies have discussed the topic before – FitSmallBusinessand LeadGibbonhave done an awesome job – so there is no need to go in-depth.

Nevertheless, here are 6 useful tips on how to write business introduction emails:

  1. Keep it short: Try to wrap your whole value proposition within 5-6 sentences. Avoid writing long paragraphs.
  2. Make it about them: “I loved your article”, “You make me feel thankful”, etc. Make sure the first line is used to compliment them. And make sure the compliment is honest.
  3. Offer value they can’t refuse: Offer solutions to their problems free of charge, or suggest a tool that could work for them. 
  4. Avoid talking about yourself: People care about solutions to their problems, so that’s what you should focus on.
  5. Add a Call to Action: Try to end your emails with a CTA that can be answered with a yes/no, or is a simple button.
  6. Be polite and respectful: All throughout your email, focus on being nice and respectful towards your recipient.

3. The Company’s Introduction Email Structure

The structure of your business introduction emails highly depends on who you are trying to reach and the reason behind your email.

This is why we have created many different templates to give you an idea of what you need to pay attention to.

3.1 Business Introduction Email Samples for business contacts 

You can use a different email structure for different occasions. Remember that a business contact who has given you permission to email them is not necessarily your friend. Therefore, always address them with respect.

Here is a business introduction email sample that can be sent to any (potential) business contact:

Hi [First Name]

 

[Your introduction. Here you will introduce yourself and mention how you know the recipient. There is a high chance that the reader has personally allowed you to send him an email, which makes things even better. Then you simply need to state how you met (through the funny hat)]

 

[Personalized one-liner. Here you can compliment the reader by telling him what you like about him or his business. A good background research can do wonders here.]

 

[Your core value proposition. Here you write a short and value-packed pitch. Make sure you keep it short]

 

[Free offer. Offer to solve one or more of their problems for free, or give them information that will help them do so themselves.]

 

[Add a CTA. For your first email, ask a simple question. Don’t go overboard, just focus on getting a reply]

 

Kind regards
[Your name]

1) Business introduction email samples – Email used to address technical shortcomings:

Hi Melody,


My name is Jacob Polanski. We met last week at Marion’s fundraiser, where Jessica introduced us over a few too many mojitos.


As I mentioned during that night, I run EmailBerry, where I help companies like
Juro Inc. write emails that generate sales.


We discussed your emails and your website, and mentioned that you could implement several strategies that could increase your CTR.


Then we talked about Cameo, for which I’ve executed a similar strategy and increased Email Click-through rates by 17%.


So here I am, ready to offer a couple of ideas that can improve
Juro Inc’s newsletters, and get similar results.


Would you like to have a call sometime next week to talk about the above? 


Best Regards,

Jacob


2) Business introduction email samples – Email best used for Missed Marketing Opportunities:

Hi Konstantine,

 

My name is Jonathan and I got your email from Nick Jermain, who told me he informed you about me.


I am an avid fan of your blog and read your new additions every Friday. I really like how your content creators make complicated matters seem so simple! 


The reason I am reaching out is that I noticed that you don’t have any lead magnets or opt-in forms to turn your readers into subscribers.


I recently worked with MacroB to create several lead magnets that helped them increase their mailing list by 1721 people in just 30 days.


I have some ideas in mind, to help
Juro Inc. gain even more new subscribers so they too can benefit from your website’s content.


Would you like to hear more? I’d be happy to jump on a call with you sometime soon.

 

Best Regards,
Marko


3) Business introduction email samples – Email best used when a company makes inexperienced mistakes

Hi Greg,

 

Our common friend Mike Relington reached out to you yesterday asking to give your email address to a marketing guy.

 

I am that marketing guy! And many thanks for allowing me to send you this email.


My name is Eneas Troust and I run Email Marketing Growth (EMG) where I help companies like
Juro Inc. turn blog readers into engaged email subscribers.


I noticed that, while the body of your email was great, your Subject line was very long.


Did this affect your open rates?


I recently worked with Numericco where we tested several subject lines to see what works best for their subscribers. The result?


A 17% increase in Open rate and 8% increase in Click-through rate.


I have some ideas in mind, to help
Juro Inc. convey its message in a better way.


Does that sound like something you’re interested in? Do you have 30 minutes sometime this week to talk about your goals and see how you could optimize your emails?

 

Best Regards,
Marko


4) Business introduction email samples – Email best used for industry-specific issues

Hi Robert,

 

It’s Nadeen Elison. We met yesterday in the Blockchain event when I confused your product with a bird (embarrassing I know)!


I run Digital Marketing Growth (DMG) where I help companies like
Juro improve their rankings through SEO optimization.


After Googling your company’s name, I noticed that you are writing lots of content that includes the name “crane”.


That’s right. Crane like the bird. And I know that your product has nothing to do with the animal kingdom!


Am I right to assume that you’d like to see a lot more traffic and a better rank in Google for the keyword “cranes for sale”?

 

I have some ideas in mind, to help Juro increase its sales by making a few simple adjustments in your content.

 

I’ve done the same with Pottery, which saw a traffic increase of 95% in only 6 weeks after optimizing the meta-titles and meta-descriptions.

 

Does that sound like something you would be interested to explore further?

 

Best Regards,
Marko


3.2 Business Introduction Email Samples for contact pages

And here is a business introduction email sample that can be sent to any website’s contact page:


Hi [First Name]

 

[Personalized one-liner. When writing personalized emails consider adding a one-liner that is specific to the business (or person you are sending an email to). In many occasions, a good one-liner can be the difference between getting a response or not. Here you could also add a compliment.]

 

[Your introduction (make it about them). Keep your recipient in mind. As we said above, this is not a place for you to introduce yourself. Instead, give a compliment to the person you are reaching out to.]

 

[Your core value proposition. Here you write a short and value-packed pitch.]

 

[Free offer. Offer to solve one or more of your recipient’s problems for free, or give them information that will help them do so themselves.]

 

[Add a CTA. For your first email, ask a simple question. Don’t go overboard, just focus on getting a reply]

 

Kind regards
[Your name]

When you use the outline presented above, you can adjust it depending on the situation you are looking to address.

So, here are the email samples that you can use free of charge (FYI, thousands of people read our blog month over month thus adjust the email samples).

1)Business introduction email samples – Email used to address technical shortcomings:

Hi team Juro,

 

I noticed that your last two newsletters do not contain a Call to Action.

 

I run EmailBerry, where I help companies like Juro Inc. write emails that generate sales.

 

After taking a quick look at your previous emails, as well as your website, I identified what your strategy needs to increase your CTR.

 

I’ve executed a similar strategy and increased Email Click-through rates by 17%.

 

I have some ideas that can improve Juro Inc’s newsletters, and get similar results.

 

Would it be possible to forward this email to Tom Delgado? I think he would be the best person to talk with when it comes to email marketing.

 

Thank you for your time.

 

Best Regards,
Marko

2) Business introduction email samples – Email best used for Missed Marketing Opportunities:

Hi team Juro,

 

I just read your Medium article and I totally agree that startups should focus on Email Marketing to create an initial fan base.

 

I run EmailBerry where I help companies like Juro Inc. turn blog readers into email subscribers.

 

I noticed that, while you have a great blog, you don’t have any lead magnets or opt-in forms to turn your readers into subscribers.

 

I recently worked with MacroB to create several lead magnets that helped them increase their mailing list by 1721 people in just 30 days.

 

I have some ideas in mind, to help Juro Inc. gain even more new subscribers and i think the best person to talk with would be your Marketing manager.

 

Would you mind forwarding this email to Juro’s marketing manager, so we could potentially discuss this topic further?

 

Best Regards,
Marko

3) Business introduction email samples – Email best used when a company makes inexperienced mistakes

Hi Juro team,

 

I just read your newsletter. It was packed with great and valuable content.

 

I run Email Marketing Growth (EMG) where I help companies like Juro Inc. turn blog readers into engaged email subscribers.

 

I noticed that, while the body of your email was great, your Subject line was very long.

 

I recently worked with Numericco where we tested several subject lines to see what works best for their subscribers.

 

The result?

 

A 17% increase in Open rate and 8% increase in Click-through rate.

 

I am sending this emails in hopes of having it forwarded to your email marketing manager, Marcella Ulbrigt, so I can share some tips that will help Juro Inc. convey its message in a better way.

 

I’d really appreciate it if you could do this.

 

Best Regards,
Marko

4) Business introduction email samples – Email best used for industry-specific issues

Hi team Juro,

 

I have been following your blog for some time and I enjoy reading your posts, especially this one: “What to look for when investing in new cranes”.

 

My name is Marko and I run Digital Marketing Growth (DMG) where I help companies like Juro improve their rankings through SEO optimization.

 

I noticed that you are selling heavy machinery and you are heavily focused on cranes.

 

Words with multiple meanings, like crane, can often confuse readers who may be searching for the machinery or the bird.

 

As a result, your organic traffic will not drive as much traffic as you’d have hoped for.

 

I recently worked with Coalmix for a similar issue and, after fixing the Meta Titles and Meta descriptions we saw a traffic increase of 223% in a 2-month timeframe.

 

Therefore, I’d like to reach out to your marketing manager to share some ideas that will help Juro increase its sales by making a few simple adjustments in the content.

 

Could you forward this email to him?

 

Best Regards,
Marko

 

So, here you go – 4 templates to use when you are sending an email to a website’s customer support.

Note: Personalize the text for each email you send out and make sure to adjust the contents according to the company’s industry.

If your offer really interests the person you are trying to reach, they will reply in hopes of hearing more.

The great thing with this method is that you get permission the moment the support team decides to forward the email to the person you are trying to reach.

Doing so will ensure you are not perceived as spam and/or end up having your email address blacklisted.

The Key Takeaways

If you have made it this far there is a lot to digest!

Using the business introduction email samples shown above will help you improve both your network and your business.

But before you go, here is a quick recap of what you need to remember to make the most out of your business introduction emails:

  • Prospecting clients should be your number 1 priority. No copywriting skills will work if you send them to the wrong recipient.
  • Narrow down your value proposition in a 1-sentence pitchand use it in your emails.
  • Use a value-packed subject line that induces curiosity.
  • Keep your emails short. Focus on the problem of your reader and the solutions you can offer.
  • If possible, start your emails with a personalized line before your introduction to increase your response rates.
  • Always be polite and respectful.
  • Last but not least, end with a Call to Action – book a call, click here, visit our site, schedule a product demo, etc.

Now it’s time to use your newly acquired skills to get some new business contacts.

Feel free to use your favorite business introduction email sample from the ones shown above and see the replies stack up in your inbox.

And don’t forget to share the results of your campaigns in the comment section below.

 

Step 2: Introduce yourself — think the 5Ws so that your recipient gets all the info they need in the first line Composing the perfect introduction email Sample Introduction Email: . 3 Email Examples You Can Use to Ask About Job Openings.

The Three Ways to Introduce Two People Over Email

sample introduction email to client

There are 3.8 billion email users in the world. Pretty much any person that you want to get in touch with, you can do so via cold email.

In our recent blog post titled "Six simple steps to getting started with cold sales emails", we discussed the basics of cold emails and offered some simple benchmarks on what results to expect.

Many of you asked us to follow up the piece with some cold email templates. Today, we want to share five cold email templates that will generate warm leads and get you started on the right foot!

Every company, of course, is different but the below cold email templates and best practices will be a good starting point you. Keep in mind that the average business user gets 97 emails per day—these templates will help you stand out, get noticed, and elicit a response.

Step 1: The art and science of effective cold email subject lines

When it comes to subject lines, follow these guidelines:

  • Use their name in the subject line when it makes sense.
  • Make the subject line as specific as possible. The more personal the subject line, the higher the open rate.
  • If you wonder if it sounds too much like a "marketing email", then it does sound too much like a marketing email :)
  • Experiment with questions in subject lines.
  • Always deliver in your email what you promise in your subject line (if the disconnect is too big, you're going to get good open rates but bad responses).

Here are 4 cold email subject lines that get open rates of +35%:

  1. "[Introduction] [name]" or "[Introduction] [your name/company] <> [their name/company]"
  2. "quick request"
  3. "Trying to connect"
  4. "[Name of their company]" 

Step 2: How to write effective cold emails

There are 2 approaches to cold emails used today:

  1. You're emailing someone high up in the organization asking for a referral down to the right person (aka Cold Calling 2.0).
  2. You're emailing the decision maker, directly pitching them to sign up, hop on a call, book a meeting or otherwise.

Let's get started with three cold email templates that ask for referrals within your target organization.

Cold email: Referral V1

Hi [first name],

My name is [my name] and I head up business development efforts with [my company]. We recently launched a new platform that [one sentence pitch].

I am taking an educated stab in the dark here, however based on your online profile, you appear to be an appropriate person to connect with ... or might at least point me in the right direction.

I’d like to speak with someone from [company] who is responsible for [handling something that's relevant to my product].

If that’s you, are you open to a fifteen minute call on _________ [time and date] to discuss ways the [company name] platform can specifically help your business? If not you, can you please put me in touch with the right person?

I appreciate the help!

Best,

Sig

Cold email: Referral V2

Hi [first name],

I hope I'm not bothering you. Could you please refer me to the person in charge of [something that's relevant to my product]?

Thanks for your time,

Sig

Cold email: Referral V3

Hey [first name],

My name is [my name] and I'm with [my company name]. We work with organizations like [company name] to [insert one sentence pitch].

[One sentence unique benefit].

Could you direct me to the right person to talk to about this at [company name] so we can explore if this would be something valuable to incorporate into your events?

Cheers,

Sig

The next referral cold email is a template directly from the team at Predictable Revenue.

Subject: Can you point me in the right direction?

Hey [first name],

I'm sorry to trouble you. Would you be so kind as to tell me who is responsible for [insert your biggest pain point here that resonates with your ideal customer; OR insert function like “sales” or “recruiting”] and how I might get in touch with them?

Thank you,

Sig 

Let's check out two cold email templates that are using approach #2 and pitching the decision maker directly on the value proposition and next action steps.

Cold email: Selling V1

Hey [first name],

I hope this email finds you well! I wanted to reach out because [explain how we got their contact information and how we relate to them: talked to a colleague, saw your company online, etc.].

[Name of company] has a new platform that will help (your team at) [organization name]. [One sentence pitch of benefits]. We do this by:

  • Benefit/feature 1
  • Benefit/feature 2
  • Benefit/feature 3 (optional)

Let's explore how [name of your software] can specifically help your business. Are you available for a quick call [time and date]?

Cheers,

Sig

Cold email: Selling V2

Hey [first name],

I hope this email finds you well! I wanted to reach out because [explain how we got their contact information and how we relate to them: talked to a colleague, saw your company online, etc.].

[Name of company] has a new platform that will help (your team at) [organization name]. [One sentence pitch of benefits].

I know that [our product] will be able to help [name of your company] [insert high level benefit here].

Are you available for a quick call [time and date]?

Cheers,

Sig

Step 3: How to set up and send cold emails

Are you ready to start utilizing these cold email templates? You can do so easily within Close by simply creating a new email template for each of these examples. Once created, you can edit and use them without having to retype them, copy and paste, etc.—saving you more time in your day. Here's how:

  1. First, sign up for a free 14-day trial of Close here (no credit card required).
  2. Once signed up and logged in, create a new email template (Your Account > Your Email Templates). You can customize this further by inserting template tags, adding attachments, and more.
  3. Import your leads and select which lead you would like to send an email to. Navigate to your name in the top left and click the drop down menu. Select “Import Data,” then drag and drop your email list, click to upload it, paste from Excel, or import from a CRM.
  4. Visit a lead's activity page from your lead list. Click to send an email, choose a template, then schedule the email to send now or schedule it for a later date.
  5. Send more emails and close some deals!

You also have the ability to connect your email account with Close (via IMAP/SMTP). By doing so, you can send emails within the app or continue using your current email client. After you connect your email, Close will begin to automatically track and auto-log your email.

When it comes to email prospecting, the fortune is in the follow-up!

Don't stop at the first email you send to a prospect. You always want to follow up with prospects multiple times. Which is why we've also created the ultimate guide to follow-up emails, where you will find more examples on different kinds of follow-up emails for sales and marketing teams.

Let us know what you think, and feel free to share your most successful cold email templates in the comments :). Be sure to also download your free copy of Cold Email Hacks.

It's not just about which cold email templates you use, but about how you use them.

These cold email hacks will help you generate more qualified leads faster. Just enter your email address below and we'll send them your way!

Download these cold email templates now

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Thank customer for business

How To Write an Introduction Letter (Samples Included)

sample introduction email to client

When you’re sending an email message to introduce yourself, it’s important to send a professional email message that engages the reader and clearly states why you’re writing. Most people are inundated with email, and it can be tricky to get an email message from someone they don’t know opened, let alone read.

Review these tips for getting your email messages opened, read, and responded to, with examples of email subject lines to use, and formal and casual email introductions.

How to Introduce Yourself in an Email

Write a message opening subject line. How many email messages do you trash without ever opening them? Pay attention to what you include in the subject line, so yours has a chance of getting opened. Be specific, and let the reader know why you are writing. Keep your subject line short, so the recipient can see, at a glance, what the message is about.

Address your message to a person. If you can find a person to write to rather than a generic email address, like hr@companyabc.com, you will be able to connect personally with individuals you want to meet.

Use your connections. When writing an introductory email or LinkedIn message if you have someone in common mention them. A referral is one of the best ways to get advice or assistance.

Don’t make a demand. It’s much better to make a suggestion or ask for advice than it is to dictate to someone. For example, “Would you be able to give me feedback on my resume, if time permits?” sounds much better than “Please review my resume and get back to me.” Being polite and asking will get you further than telling someone what they should do.

Keep it short. Most people skim emails and rarely read beyond the first paragraph or so. Keep your message short – 2 or 3 paragraphs at the most. Don’t include more than a few sentences in each paragraph.

Do be clear about why you’re writing. Your email message should clearly state who you are, why you are writing and what you’re requesting from the reader.

Use a simple font. Use a simple font (like Calibri, Times New Roman, or Arial) and a font size that is easy to read. An 11 or 12-point font size is readable without having to squint. Here’s how to select a font style and size.

Pick a professional closing. Your closing is almost as important as your introduction. End your email with short professional closing. Here’s how to end a letter with examples of good closings to use.

Include a signature. Make it easy for the person you’re emailing to get back in touch with you. Include a signature with your full name, email address, and phone number. Include your mailing address if you’re asking for a written response or to have something to be sent to you. Here’s how to set up your email signature.

Proofread and spell check. When you’re introducing yourself, it’s important to proofread and spell check your message prior to sending it. You’ve only got one chance to make a good impression, and a typo can get your email message trashed.

Send a test message. To be sure your message is perfect, send it to yourself first so you can double check how it reads and to give it a final look over to be sure it’s what you want to send.

Bcc: Yourself. It’s always a good idea to Bcc: (blind carbon copy) yourself on the message. You’ll have a record of sending it, and you’ll be able to easily refer back to it for follow-up communications.

Examples of Email Introductory Subject Lines

  • Introduction From [Your Name]
  • Inquiring About Opportunities 
  • I Found You Through [Alumni Network, LinkedIn, Professional Association, etc.)
  • [Name] Recommended I Contact You
  • [Name] Suggested I Reach Out
  • Referral From [Name]
  • Referred By [Name]

​When You Are Introducing Two Other People to Each Other:

  • Introduction: [Name] - [Name]
  • Introducing [Name] to [Name]
  • Connecting: [Name] - [Name]
  • [Name] and [Name] Introduction

Examples of Email Introductions

Formal Introduction Example (Text Version)

Dear Ms. Smith,

My name is Marcus Anderson, and I’m writing to ask for your assistance. I’d very much appreciate your help and advice.

Casual Introduction Example (Text Version)

Hi First Name,

My name is Cynthia, and I work for a tech recruiting firm called ABCD recruiting. Hope you're well! I’d love to tell you more about an event we’re launching.

Introduction With a Referral Example (Text Version)

Dear Ms. Smith,

I am a friend of Alisa Markers, and she encouraged me to forward my resume to you. Alisa and I worked on several projects together, and she thought that you might be able to help me with my job search.

Email Introducing Someone Else Example (Text Version)

Dear Jonas,

Hope this finds you well! I’m reaching out today to introduce my colleague Samantha Billings, who recently joined our company and is taking over communications for DBC Company.

Use the first paragraph to introduce yourself, the second for your request, and the third to thank the reader for his or her consideration.

An introduction letter to a client is a formal letter written to introduce oneself to a frequent Introduction Letter To Client Sample, Email and Example/Format.

Business email reply sample

sample introduction email to client

How do you convince someone to give you a chance when they’ve never met you? Ask for an introduction email.

Fact: Nine out of 10 people trust recommendations from others they know.

Connecting through a mutual acquaintance can be the difference between a cold email and a warm welcome.

Even better, with the right introduction email template, you save time writing but still show that you put in the extra effort.

Here are three types of introduction emails you can start writing today to land more clients, book more meetings, and grow your career.

    1. The Two-In-One 
    2. The Double Opt-In
    3. The Top-Down Approach

Know you’re sending your emails at the right time with this free tool.

 

The Two-In-One: How To Ask For An Email Introduction

Tight on time? Here’s a doc with all 3 templates — for easy copying.

A poorly written introduction request reads like a shoddy instruction manual.

The bottom line: It pays to draft an email they can easily forward on your behalf.

The bulk of the content should be written directly to the person you’d like to meet as if they were reading it as-is.

It should include:

  1. Evidence that you’ve done your research. Seeing this makes people more motivated to help you.

  2. A clear reason why your target person would benefit from the intro. Satisfying our own self-interests is pretty darn appealing (just how our brains work).

  3. A succinct message that closes with a clear call to action. Roughly half of email replies are less than 43 words.

Real-world use case: This email introduction sample from Yesware Sales Development Representative who used all three persuasive elements to ask for an introduction (prospect names have been changed):

With all the boxes checked, she made it super easy for Mark to go ahead and forward her request along to Chad — less than 20 minutes later.

Save your intro request as a customizable template that lives in your inbox.

The Double Opt-In: How To Write A Professional Introduction Email

So what happens when you’re on the receiving end of an introduction request? We recommend keeping it courteous with the double-opt in method.

Fred Wilson popularized this networking approach as a helpful reminder to be respectful of people’s time. The idea is to ask permission from both parties before green-lighting unsolicited introductions, giving either person a chance to decline if they so choose.

And here’s a step-by-step breakdown of :

  • First ask the requestor to write you an intro email you can forward along to your contact (if they haven’t already).
  • Add a personal note up top — compliments are persuasive, remember?
  • Get to the point quickly; you’re asking for a favor
  • Put your request in bold font so it directs attention to the action item
  • End with a personal note wishing your acquaintance well

Real world use-case: Here’s how our former VP of Sales used this method to let someone opt-in to an email introduction requested by one of our sales reps. It offers clear and compelling reasons why Marsha could benefit from accepting the offer, but only “if possible” and on her terms.

Perfect the double opt-in with this simple, reusable template.

The Top-Down Approach: How To Get An Inside Referral

If you don’t have a mutual connection with the person you’re trying to reach, you may want to try what we call a top-down approach to email introductions. It goes a little something like this:

  1. Use LinkedIn to determine who your prospect’s boss is.
  2. Send a cold email to that Director/VP/CEO level person asking who manages the initiative you’re interested in discussing.
  3. They (hopefully) point you in the direction of who you want to reach.
  4. You reference their referral in an email introducing yourself to your prospect, or forward the original email inquiry along with the boss on CC.

Not only does this get you an introduction from someone inside that person’s company, it’s coming from their boss — which makes it much more likely that they’ll reply. That’s because we’re naturally conditioned to follow the lead of authority figures.

Real world use-case: Here’s a great email introduction sample from Yesware’s CEO that shows what happened when someone (real name changed) asked to connect with a member of our marketing team.

And the response…?

Boom. Intro made. (Although note that we are an email-focused company — other CEOs might not be so responsive 😉 ).

Here’s the introduction email template you can steal in seconds.

Step 2: Introduce yourself — think the 5Ws so that your recipient gets all the info they need in the first line Composing the perfect introduction email Sample Introduction Email: . 3 Email Examples You Can Use to Ask About Job Openings.

sample introduction email to client
Written by Yozshulabar
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