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Corporate letter writing examples
September 14, 2018 Anniversary Wishes 4 comments

Sample of CV and Cover Letter. If you are looking for a great CV template or ideas on what to write in a cover letter, look at the samples below. A great CV is not.

You’ve perfected your resume.

You’ve short-listed the coolest jobs you want to apply for.

You’ve even had a friend train you for every single interview question out there.

But then, before you can send your application and call it a day, you remember that the job ad requires a cover letter.

Now you’re stuck wondering how to write a cover letter...

Don’t panic! We’ve got you covered. Writing a cover letter is a lot simpler than you might think.

In this guide, we’re going to teach you how to write a cover letter that gets you the job you deserve:

What is a Cover Letter? (and Why It’s Important)

A cover letter is a one-page document that you submit as part of your job application (alongside your CV or Resume). 

Its purpose is to introduce you and briefly summarize your professional background. On average, your cover letter should be from 250 to 400 words long.

A good cover letter can spark the HR manager’s interest and get them to read your resume. 

A bad cover letter, on the other hand, might mean that your application is going directly to the paper shredder. So, to make sure this doesn’t happen, it’s essential to know how to write a convincing cover letter.

How does a good cover letter look, you might ask. Well, here’s an example:

CREATE YOUR COVER LETTER NOW

Keep in mind, though, that a cover letter is a supplement to your resume, not a replacement. Meaning, you don’t just repeat whatever is mentioned in your resume.

If you’re writing a cover letter for the first time, writing all this might seem pretty tough. After all, you’re probably not a professional writer.

The thing is, though, you don’t need to be creative, or even any good at writing. All you have to do is follow a tried-and-tested format:

  • Header - Input contact information
  • Greeting the hiring manager
  • Opening paragraph - Grab the reader’s attention with 2-3 of your top achievements
  • Second paragraph - Explain why you’re the perfect candidate for the job
  • Third paragraph - Explain why you’re a good match for the company
  • Formal closing

Or, here’s what this looks like in practice:

How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter (And Get Hired!)

Now that we’ve got the basics out of the way, we’re going to guide you through the process of writing a cover letter step by step. 

Step #1 - Pick the Right Cover Letter Template

A good cover letter is all about leaving the right first impression.

So, what’s a better way to leave a good impression than a well-formatted, visual template?

CREATE YOUR COVER LETTER NOW

You can simply pick one of our hand-picked cover letter templates, and you’ll be all set in a jiffy!

As a bonus, our content optimizer will even give you suggestions on how to improve your cover letter on the go.

Step #2 - Start the Cover Letter with a Header

As with a resume, it’s important to start your cover letter with a Contact Information section:

Here, you want to include all essential information, including:

  • Full Name
  • Phone Number
  • Email
  • Date
  • Name of the hiring manager / their professional title
  • Name of the company you’re applying to

In certain cases, you might also consider adding:

  • Social Media Profiles - Any type of profile that’s relevant to your field. Social Profiles on websites like LinkedIn, GitHub (for developers), Dribble (for designers), etc.
  • Personal Website - If you have a personal website that somehow adds value to your application, you can mention it. Let’s say you’re a professional writer. In that case, you’d want to link to your blog.

And here’s what you shouldn’t mention in your header:

  • Your Address / City of Residence - This is something you include in your resume, not the cover letter.
  • Unprofessional Email - Make sure your email is presentable. It’s pretty hard for a hiring manager to take you seriously if your email address is [email protected] Whenever applying for jobs, stick to the “[first name] + [last name] @ email provider.com” format.

Step #3 - Greet the Hiring Manager

Once you’ve properly listed your contact information, you need to start writing the cover letter contents.

The first thing to do here is to address the cover letter to the hiring manager.

That’s right, the hiring manager! Not the overly popular “Dear Sir or Madam.” You want to show your future boss that you did your research and are really passionate about working with their team.

No one wants to hire a job seeker who just spams 20+ companies and hopes to get hired in any of them.

So, how do you find out who’s the hiring manager? There are several ways to do this. 

The simplest option is to look up the head of the relevant department on LinkedIn. Let’s say you’re applying for the position of a Marketing Assistant at Novorésumé. The hiring manager is probably Head of Marketing or Chief Marketing Officer.

So, you do a quick lookup on LinkedIn:

And voila! You have your hiring manager.

Or let’s say you’re applying for the position of a server. In that case, you’d be looking for the “restaurant manager.”

If this doesn’t work, you can also check out the “Team” page on the company website; there’s a good chance you’ll at least find the right person there.

Still can’t seem to find the right person? Here are several other greetings you could use:

  • Dear [Department] Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • To whom it may concern
  • Dear [Department] Team

Step #4 - Write an Attention-Grabbing Introduction

First impressions matter, especially when it comes to your job search.

Recruiters get hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of applications. Chances are, they’re not going to be reading every single cover letter end-to-end.

So, it’s essential to catch their attention from the very first paragraph.

The #1 problem we see with most cover letter opening paragraphs is that they’re usually extremely generic. Most of them look something like this...

Wrong Example

Hey, my name is Jonathan and I’d like to work as a Sales Manager at XYZ Inc. I’ve worked as a sales manager at MadeUpCompany Inc. for 5+ years, so I believe that I’d be a good fit for the position.

See the issue here? This opening paragraph doesn’t say pretty much anything except the fact that you’ve worked the job before.

Do you know who else has similar work experience? All the other applicants you’re competing with.

Instead, you want to start off with 2-3 of your top achievements to really grab the reader’s attention. Preferably, the achievements should be as relevant as possible to the position.

So now, let’s make our previous example shine:

Correct Example

Dear Josh Smith,

My name is Michael and I’d like to help XYZ Inc. hit and exceed their sales goals as a Sales Manager. I’ve worked with Company X, a fin-tech company, for 3+ years. As a Sales Representative, I generated an average of $30,000+ in salesper month (beating the KPIs by around 40%). I believe that my previous industry experience, as well as excellence in sales, makes me the right candidate for the job.

See the difference between the two examples? If you were the hiring manager, which sales manager would you hire, Jonathan or Michael?

Exactly!

Now that we’ve covered the introduction, let’s talk about the body of your cover letter. This part is split into two paragraphs: the first is for explaining why you’re the perfect person for the job, and the latter is for proving that you’re a good fit for the company.

So, let’s get started...

Step #5 - Explain why you’re the perfect person for the job

This is where you show off your professional skills and convince the HR manager that you’re a better fit for the job than all the other applicants.

But first things first - before you even write anything, you need to learn what the most important requirements for the role are. So, open up the job ad and identify which of the responsibilities are the most critical.

For the sake of the example, let’s say you’re applying for the position of a Facebook Advertiser. You scan the job ad and see that the top requirements are:

  1. Experience managing a Facebook ad budget of 0,000+ / month
  2. Some skills in advertising on other platforms (Google Search + Twitter)
  3. Excellent copywriting skills

Now, in this section, you need to discuss how you fulfil these requirements. So, here’s how that would look for our example:

Good Example

In my previous role as a Facebook Marketing Expert at XYZ Inc. I handled customer acquisition through ads, managing a monthly Facebook ad budget of $20,000+. As the sole digital marketer at the company, I managed the ad creation & management process end-to-end. Meaning, I created the ad copy, images, picked the targeting, ran optimization trials, and so on.

Other than Facebook advertising, I’ve also delved into other online PPC channels, including:

  • Google Search
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Quora

Are you a student applying for your first internship? You probably don’t have a lot of work experience to show off in this section. Learn how to write an internship cover letter here.

Step #6 - Explain why you’re a good fit for the company

Once you’ve written the last paragraph, you might be thinking - I’m a shoo-in for the job! What else do I need to write? I’ll just wrap up the cover letter and hit that sweet SEND button.

Well, no. You’re not quite there yet.

The HR manager doesn’t only look at whether you’ll be good at the job or not. They’re looking for someone that’s also a good fit for the company culture.

After all, employees that don’t fit in are bound to quit, sooner or later. This ends up costing the company a ton of money, up to 50% of the employee’s annual salary. 

Meaning, you also need to convince the HR manager that you’re really passionate about working with them.

How do you do this? Well, as a start, you want to do some research about the company. You want to know things like:

  • What’s the company’s business model?
  • What’s the company product or service? Have you used it?
  • What’s the culture like? Will someone micro-manage your work, or will you have autonomy on how you get things done?

So, get to Googling. Chances are, you’ll find all the information you need either on the company website or somewhere around the web.

Then, you need to figure out what you like about the company and turn that into text.

Let’s say, for example, you’re passionate about their product and you like the culture of innovation / independent work in the organization.

You’d write something like:

Correct Example

I’ve personally used the XYZ Smartphone, and I believe that it’s the most innovative tech I’ve used in years. The features such as Made-Up-Feature #1 and Made-Up-Feature #2 were real game changers for the device. 

I really admire how Company XYZ thrives for excellence for all its product lines, creating market-leading tech. As someone that thrives in a self-driven environment, I truly believe that I and Company XYZ will be a great match.

What you don’t want to do here is be super generic for the sake of having something to write. Most job seekers tend to mess this one up. Let’s take a look at a very common example we tend to see (way too often):

Incorrect Example

I’d love to work for Company XYZ because of its culture of innovation. I believe that since I’m super creative, I’d be a good fit for the company. The company values of integrity and transparency really vibe with me.

See what’s wrong here? The example doesn’t really say anything about the company. “Culture of Innovation” is something most companies claim to have. 

The same goes for “values of integrity and transparency” - the writer just googled what the values for the organization are, and said that they like them.

Any hiring manager that reads this will see through the fluff.

So, make sure to do a lot of research and come up with good reasons why you're applying.

Step #7 - Wrap up with a call to action

Finally, it’s time to finish up your cover letter and write the conclusion.

In the final paragraph, you want to:

  • Wrap up any points you couldn't in the previous paragraphs. Do you have anything left to say? Any other information that could help the hiring manager make their decision? Mention it here.
  • Thank the hiring manager for their time. It never hurts to be courteous, as long as you don’t come off as too needy.
  • Finish the cover letter with a call to action. The very last sentence in your cover letter should be a call to action. You should ask the hiring manager to take some sort of action.

And now, let’s turn this into a practical example:

  • So to wrap it all up, thanks for looking into my application. I hope I can help Company X make the most out of their Facebook marketing initiatives. I'd love to further discuss how my previous success at XYZ Inc. can help you achieve your facebook marketing goals.

Step #8 - Use the right formal closing

Once you’re done with the final paragraph, all you have to do is write down a formal “goodbye” and you’re good to go.

Feel free to use one of the most popular conclusions to a cover letter:

  • Best Regards,
  • Kind Regards,
  • Sincerely,
  • Thank you,

And we’re finally done! Before sending off the cover letter, make sure to proofread it with software like Grammarly, or maybe even get a friend to review it for you.

Next Steps in Your Job Search - Creating a Killer Resume

Your cover letter is only as good as your resume. If either one is weak, your entire application is for naught. 

After all, a cover letter is just an introduction. Imagine going through all this effort to leave an amazing first impression, but flopping at the end because of a mediocre resume.

...But don’t you worry, we’ve got you covered on that end, too.

If you want to learn more about Resumes & CVs, we have a dedicated FREE guide for that. Check out our complete guide on how to make a resume - our experts will teach you everything you need to know in order to land your dream job.

Or, if you’re already an expert, just pick one of our resume templates and get started.

CREATE YOUR RESUME NOW

How to Write a Good Customer Service Letter – With Examples . hurt to continue to stress that “your business is very much appreciated”.

Formatting Your Business Letter: Definitions, Tips and Examples

corporate letter writing examples

Sample Business Letters

Here is a selection of sample business letters and other correspondence that you can copy and modify as you wish.

These sample letters contain useful vocabulary that you may want to use in your own business correspondence. If you decide to copy and modify any of these letters for your own use, make sure you are choosing the right words. This glossary for business letters offers simple definitions of the vocabulary used in these samples.

Sample Letter Requesting Information
How to ask somebody to send you information.

Sample Letter Sending Information
What to say when you send information.

Sample Letter Changing Information
When a person or company changes important information, such as an address, price, or date, it is necessary to send valued customers a letter with the new information. This letter informs customers of a change in price.

Sample Resume or CV
A resume (AmE) or CV (BrE) is usually requested by a prospective employer as a record of your qualifications and professional experience. CV stands for the Latin words "curriculum vitae", meaning "the course of one's life".

Sample Covering Letter for Resume or CV
It is usual to send a covering letter (BrE) or cover letter (AmE) with your resume/CV when applying for a job.

Sample Letter of Reference
Companies and other organizations often ask for a letter of reference. This is a character reference written by someone such as an ex-employer who knows the subject personally.

Sample Letter of Resignation
Though it is not necessary to give a reason, it is standard business procedure to send written notice informing your employer that you are planning to quit your job.

Sample Lay-off Notice
Companies and other organizations are usually required by law to present a written notice to employees informing them of a lay-off. This letter usually cites reasons for the lay-off, and acts as a formal apology. Employee rights may be included.

Sample Letter of Invitation
It is often necessary in business to send an invitation to a person or group requesting their attendance at a special event.

Sample Letter of Request for Payment
Sometimes it is necessary to remind customers that they owe you money!

Sample Internal Memorandum
Memos are sometimes used internally to inform an entire company or department of something. This is an example of a memo referring to a staff Christmas party.

Sample Welcome Email
It is a common business practice to welcome new staff members to a company. This is usually an informal note expressing best wishes and may contain contact information. Companies may also send welcome letters to other companies that move into a shared office building, or to visiting guest speakers and business travellers.

happy engagement wish
Words for nominating someone for an award
thank you note for overnight stay
My love my life in spanish
message for apology
Christmas closure notice template
thank you for taking the time to
Thank you for your business email template

Examples of business letter format.

corporate letter writing examples

This page will teach you the how to properly format a business letter, as well as provide a wealth of examples, templates, and writing guides to help you write yours.

Table of Contents

  1. Business Letter Examples
  2. Sample Business Letter Template
  3. Business Letter Format & Writing Guide

1. Business Letter Examples: Common & Career-Specific Types

We’ve provided extensive how-to guides for writing the following common examples of business letters. Just click the images below to download our free letter templates.

2. Sample Business Letter Template

The business world is filled with intricate behavior guidelines and overly formal communication styles. A business letter allows multiple parties to exchange relevant information professionally. It can also be more impactful to a reader than an email, due its formalized structure, content, and tone.

Our general business letter template can be used for any kind of professional communication/correspondence, including cover letters and letters of interest. Simply decide if you want a letterhead, click the download button, and let our template guide you through the writing process.

Business Letter Template: Click to Read in Text Format

Business Letter Format – Without Letterhead (Text Format)

[1234 Street Address]

[City, State, Zip]

[Email Address]

 

[Today’s Date]

 

[Addressee Name]

[Addressee Title]

[Company Name]

[1234 Street Address]

[City, State, Zip]

 

Dear [Name],

In this paragraph, deliver a friendly and clear introduction. State the main point of the letter here. Keep this section short and to the point.

In this paragraph, explain the importance of the main point by providing compelling and persuasive reasoning.

In this paragraph, continue to provide background information to back up your reasons. You can use facts, data, and other quantifiable metrics to support your claim.

Close by restating the main point of the letter, and if you can, include a call to action.

Respectfully/Sincerely,

 

 

[Your Signature]

[Your Name]

3. Formal Business Letter Format & Writing Guide

When it comes to how to format a letter, you need to pay attention to the format of both the page and the content. Both are essential for creating the professional look that is the foundation of any proper business letter.

Page Format – 5 Key Rules

Before you begin writing, decide which layout you want to use. There are two common formatting styles: block and modified block. The block format has a left-aligned address and closing, while those in the modified block are right-aligned. While the block format is used more often, both are acceptable for a formal letter.

The following are the standard rules that should be adhered to when formatting the page of a formal letter:

1. Alignment:

All proper business letters should be left-aligned, any other type of alignment is considered unacceptable in most professional settings.

2. Spacing:

Your letter should be single-spaced. In addition, there should be a space between the date, address, salutation, and each paragraph. Include four line breaks between the closing and your printed name to leave space for your signature.

3. Font:

The standard font style is Times New Roman, size 12. However, you can use other sans-serif fonts such as Helvetica, Arial, Courier, or Geneva, also at size 12. Sans-serif fonts have been credited with increased readability because of their balanced typeface.

4. Lines:

When using a letterhead, be sure to add a horizontal line underneath it. You can refer to our letters above to see some examples.

5. Margins:

Keep your margins between 1 to 1.5 inches. Generally speaking, 1-inch margins are the most widely accepted format for professionals.

If you want to be taken seriously, make sure all of your punctuation is used correctly.

Content Format & How To Write a Business Letter

The following tips cover all the parts of a business letter in order from top to bottom.

Part 1 (a). Letterhead – Formal Letter Format

Most professional business letters include a letterhead – which is comprised of your name, address, phone number, and email address. 

Letterheads are meant to make your letter unique, as well as help verify its authenticity to the recipient. Likewise, you can include your company’s logo on the letterhead for brand recognition and a more trustworthy appearance.

Check out the example letterheads below — both of which are acceptable methods for displaying your name and contact information. For more ideas, you can check out ourcover letter templates. See the letterhead sample:

Part 1 (b). No Letterhead – Formal Letter Format

Using a letterhead is always preferable when writing a business letter. However, if you decide to not use one, you must use the following format to maintain a professional appearance:

  • Write your contact information on the top left of the page, just above the date.
  • Do NOT include your name in this section — when selecting this style, it simply looks better to sign off with your name at the end of the letter.
  • Only include your street address, city, state, and zip code.
  • Double check our business letter sample to make sure yours is perfect.

Example of format when not using a letterhead:

Part 2. Date

The date should be the day on which you completed the letter, written in standard U.S. format (eg. October 28, 2017). It should be written underneath the letterhead, or underneath the address on the top left of the page.

Part 3. Addressee – How to Address a Letter in 4 Steps

Write the recipient’s (or “addressee’s”) address on the top left side underneath the date. Begin with the name of the addressee on the first line. Some research may be necessary to find the name (LinkedIn, the company’s website, even Google search are all great tools).

  • Step 1: Address them properly as Ms., Mrs., or Mr. Also, make sure to include their title — such as Dr. — if it applies.
  • Step 2: Beneath their name, write their current title. If you are unsure what their title is, do the necessary research to find out if possible. If they have no title, leave it blank.
  • Step 3: Include the name of their company underneath their title.
  • Step 4: Write out their company’s street address, city, state, and zip code. If they are located outside the United States, include the country name after the city.

Even if you’re sending your letter as an email attachment, you should still include the address to maintain a professional appearance.

Part 4. Salutation

The salutation you will use depends on the title of your addressee, your familiarity with them, and also the context of the letter.

If you are familiar with the addressee, then use their first name (unless they have specifically asked you otherwise).

  • If the addressee has earned a Ph.D. or an MD, then refer to them as Dr. (or Professor).
  • Military titles such as General, Colonel, Major, etc., should be honored as such.
  • If you do not know the contact person or you are addressing a group, use an appropriate salutation such as Sir or Madam, Hiring Manager, Director of Human Resources, Members of the [Name] Committee (hiring committee, organizing committee, acceptance committee), Board of Directors.

When it comes to salutations, it is always better to err on the side of caution and be polite as possible.

Part 5. Body

The body of the letter is located underneath the salutation, and is the field where you get down to business and discuss the reason you’re reaching out to this person. Usually, the body includes several strategic paragraphs meant to inform, persuade, and convey gratitude.

  1. In the first paragraph, get to your point quickly and state it concisely in the first line. Do not wait until the second paragraph to tell your audience what your main point is – they most likely won’t get that far.
  2. In the second paragraph, use evidence and persuasive reasoning to justify your main point. If needed, use an extra paragraph to further support your point via empirical evidence.
  3. The closing paragraph should restate the point of the letter, and most importantly, include a call to action. A call to action is a passage that compels your reader to do something. Ask yourself, “what do I want my reader to do right after reading this letter?

Examples of calls to action:

  • Please call me at [phone #] or email me at [email address] at your earliest convenience.”
  • Please get in touch with me at your earliest convenience to schedule a meeting.”
  • Please let me know how I may be of assistance during this period.”

Part 6. Closing

You should always close with a positive sign-off, such as “Thank you,” “Sincerely,” or “Respectfully.” Remember to only capitalize the first word of this closing  line, and to leave four lines of space between the closing line and your typed name to make room for your signature.

Part 7. Enclosure

An enclosure note is an often neglected aspect of letter writing in the digital era. In fact, not many people actually know what ‘enclosure’ means. When you write “enclosure” in any letter you’re implying that another document is attached to the file.

Think of it as something akin to a “see attachment” note in an email. It alerts the reader to another part of your correspondence – and helps prevent them from overlooking a crucial document.

The image below shows where the word “enclosure” should be placed:

6. Conclusion

Knowing how to write a business letter is a fundamental skill for your professional life. A proper one will have most or all of the elements mentioned above. Be sure to carefully review the grammar, spelling, and format of your business letter numerous times before you send it out, to avoid leaving a poor first impression with your correspondent.

Looking for some more ideas on how to write a letter? Our experts have written of guides on how to write various types of formal letters. Check out our comprehensive letter of recommendation sample libraryfor more inspiration!

Written by the Resume Genius Team

The Resume Genius Team is made up of a tight-knit crew of dedicated career coaches, hiring managers, and staff writers who are passionate about providing the best, most up-to-date career advice possible and helping job... more

How to Write a Cover Letter & Get the Job [5+ Real-Life Examples]. September 18 . What's the company's business model? What's the company product or.

Email Cover Letter: Sample, Proper Email Format, 20+ Tips [Infographic]

corporate letter writing examples

An is the content of an email you send with your resume. Its purpose is to explain why you're applying and introduce yourself in a very brief manner. Email cover letters are much shorter than regular cover letters you'd submit via job boards or as attachments.

 

Long story short:

 

An email cover letter isn't your good ol’ cover letter all over again.

 

If you’re applying for a job via email instead of using job boards, you’ve got a golden opportunity to get remembered by the hiring manager. But—

 

To make it happen, you need the best email cover letter out there.

 

And you are going to have one. Read on, and I’ll show you:

 

  • An email cover letter sample that will help you land that interview.
  • A tried-and-true email format for cover letters that showcases your most valuable strengths.
  • How to write a cover letter in an email to get any job you want.
  • Little known hacks for sending your cover letter email with a resume for greatest impact.

 

First, have a look at this universal, simple email cover letter sample. What do you think makes it so special?

 

Sample Email Cover Letter Template You Can Adjust and Use

 

 

I’ll tell you one thing, Jacob can expect the callback anytime!

 

It’s a perfect email cover letter template you can tweak so that it fits your situation, and use to apply for any job.

 

As you can see above, you should format your email cover letter just as any other semi-formal email. Use a standard, elegant font and double spacing between paragraphs. At the bottom, include your contact information, just as you’d do in the footer of any professional email you send.

 

Writing a regular cover letter to attach to your resume email? Learn how to make the most of it from our complete cover letter writing guide: How to Write a Cover Letter for Any Job Application

 

For more tips on formatting your cover letter, see: Cover Letter Formatting Guide

 

Need more detailed information on how to apply for a job via email? Don’t know how to find your hiring manager’s email address? Here’s a guide that will show you tons of useful tips and tricks: Job Application Email: How, When, Who to Send Your Resume To

 

And if you’re eying an internship and crafting an email cover letter for fresh graduates, see this article: Internship Cover Letter Sample & Writing Guide

 

One last thing before we go on:

 

Email cover letter—body or attachment?

 

Either. But not both.

 

Truth is, this choice won’t be decisive for your job hunt, so don’t obsess over it.

 

My suggestion is—if you’re applying by email, you’re risking that your message will reach the hiring manager in a hurry, so don’t make them open TWO attachments. Write your cover letter in your email body and enclose only your resume.

 

Want to save time and have your professional job application ready in minutes? Here are a sample cover letter and a matching resume made with our resume and cover letter builder. Write your cover letter and resume here.

 

Resume and a sample cover letter for a job application. See +15 resume and cover letter templates and create your job application here.

 

One of our users, Nikos, had this to say:

 

[I used] a nice template I found on Zety. My resume is now one page long, not three. With the same stuff.

 

Create your resume now

 

Right—

 

So you’ve seen a jaw-dropping job application email cover letter. Now, let’s break down what makes this email format for cover letters so great.

 

1

Strong Subject Line: the Only Guarantee Your Email Cover Letter Gets Opened

 

It won’t matter if your achievements are breathtakingly impressive or your skills fit all requirements of the job you’re trying to land…

 

If no one opens your job application email cover letter.

 

And guess what? That depends only on the subject line.

 

Make the most of it. In the subject line for an email cover letter with a resume, include:

 

  1. Who you are,
  2. That you’re applying for a job,
  3. The position,
  4. The company name,
  5. Job ID (if applicable).

 

Like the candidate from our sample, Jacob did:

 

Sample Email Cover Letter Subject Line

 

Senior Software Engineer[1] Seeks[2] Software Development Team Lead[3] Position with XYZ[4] (ID: 123436284)[5].

 

Pro Tip: The only instance when all of the above is of no consequence? When the employer demands all applicants to use the same subject line, for example, “Application for Position XYZ - [Your Name].” If so—you have to play by their rules.

 

How long should your cover email subject be?

 

As long as it needs to be to include all of the above info and as short as possible.

 

Need an exact figure?

 

Number of email subject characters displayed varies across devices and operating systems:

 

  • For desktop email applications it’s within the range of 46 (Yahoo Mail) to 70 (Gmail).
  • Mobile email clients? From 30 characters (Android; portrait) to 64 characters (iPhone; landscape).

 

To stay on the safe side, begin your subject line with the name of your position. It’s sure to stay within the narrowest, 30-character range, and the hiring manager will immediately know what vacancy the message is about.

 

2

Proper Greeting to Show Your Professionalism

 

The best way to start your email cover letter is with “Dear” + the hiring manager’s name.

 

Personalization will make the hiring manager feel like they’re reading something made specifically for them.

 

Don’t know the name of your hiring manager?

 

Do some research!

 

  • Double check the job ad.
  • Check LinkedIn. Job offers on LinkedIn often identify the one who did the posting.
  • Check the company website. Try to find the head of the department on the company's staff page.
  • Ask friends. You can use LinkedIn to check if you've got contacts at the company. A Facebook shout-out may work too.
  • Call. If all else fails, call the receptionist and ask who the contact person is.

 

Pro Tip: Tried all of the above to no avail? Go with “Dear [Team Name] Hiring Manager,” or “Dear [Team Name] Hiring Team,” for instance: “Dear Customer Service Hiring Manager” or “Dear Project Management Hiring Team.” The two greetings you have to avoid are: “To Whom It May Concern,” and “Dear Sir or Madam.”

 

For more details on how to address your email cover letter, see this handy guide: How to Address a Cover Letter to the Right Person

 

3

First Sentence: Short and To-The-Point

 

Sending your cover letter in an email instead of using job boards is an excellent strategy for escaping the resume black hole.

 

But there’s one downside.

 

While hiring managers book specific time slots for reviewing resumes and cover letters they got through their online recruitment systems, your email, as I said before, might reach them in a rush. For instance, heading out to a meeting or dealing with an urgent problem.

 

In an email cover letter, don’t make the hiring manager read between the lines of some fancy storytelling.

 

Be as straightforward as possible.

 

Email Cover Letter Example: First Sentence

 

Attached you will find my resume with detailed work experience for the position of [XYZ].

 

And that’ll do.

 

4

Main Paragraph: Relevance is Key

 

You’re not applying for a job. You’re applying for this job.

 

For the hiring manager, it doesn’t matter how great your career has been so far. What matters is how you can help the company with their upcoming tasks and challenges.

 

Show that in your email cover letter body:

 

  • Read the job description carefully, identify what your responsibilities will be.
  • Then, research the company online, try to find out what projects they’re running or plan to launch in the future.
  • Outline your professional achievements that can translate into success in your prospective role.
  • Highlight what you have to offer.

 

Remember Jacob, the candidate from our sample?

 

The company he’s applying to, XYZ Corp., is looking for a Software Development Team Lead to supervise the development of new mobile apps.

 

That’s what his tailored, brief email cover letter reads:

 

Sample Short Email Cover Letter Body

 

As a senior software engineer at ABC Inc., with a proven record of developing and optimizing the most strategic mobile apps and online software, increasing annual mean NPS to over 60.0 (32% rise) and cutting Customer Effort Scores in half[your achievements most relevant to the job you’re trying to land], I am sure I can help XYZ achieve similar results[an offer to leverage your experience to the benefit of your future employer] with your upcoming project of developing mobile apps for personal finance and easy online trading[knowledge of your employer’s plans and your responsibilities].

 

Pro Tip: I can’t stress this enough—an email cover letter has to be shorter than one you would include as an attachment. How short exactly? Your go-to word count should be 150, tops.

 

In need of some extra tips for your cover letter? Check out: 35+ Easy Cover Letter Tips You Can Use Today

 

 

So the hiring manager knows you’re a great candidate. Job done?

 

Not quite. Take an extra step. Reiterate your value in the call to action:

 

  • Ask the hiring manager to reach out to you and meet in person.
  • Once again, focus on what you have to offer.

 

Again, let’s have a look at the call to action from our sample:

 

Sample Email Cover Letter—Call to Action

 

Can we schedule a meeting[asking them to reach out to you] to discuss my insights and ideas on making XYZ’s software development quicker and more effective, while boosting all major KPIs [restating your offer]?

 

Pro Tip: The two worst things you can do in your email cover letter closing are coming off as needy (I’m sure I’d make a great employee, just give me a shot!) or generic (Thank you for your time and consideration).

 

For more ideas on strong and compelling ways to finish your cover letter, go here: How to End a Cover Letter the Right Way

 

 

Once you’ve written your email cover letter for a resume, you just need to put a formal greeting at the very end.

Write “sincerely” and follow it with your full name.


If you’re not a fan of the well-worn, “sincerely,” feel free to use any of the following synonyms:

 

Sample email cover letter sign-offs:

 

  • Thank you,
  • Best regards,
  • Kind regards,
  • Sincerely,
  • With best regards.

 

Pro Tip: Under your sign-off, put the necessary contact information, such as your LinkedIn profile, email address, and telephone number. To save yourself the effort of adding them every time you send an email covering letter, you can include them automatically in the footer of your email. You can also include a digital copy of your handwritten signature. It will add a nice, professional touch.

 

 

So you’ve just written your perfect, short email cover letter. Now you’re basically guaranteed to land that interview, right?

 

Wrong.

 

Let me just quote what one recruiter wrote in her LinkedIn article:

 

Dear Applicant,

Your email arrived with a cover letter in the main body. I was really impressed and could not wait to review your resume. There was only one problem. You’d forgotten to attach it.

I replied to your email asking you to reattach your resume and you did not respond until the following day. In any case, it was already too late.

I don’t think you really wanted that job.

Ann Ayinde

Human Resources Business Partner at British Council

 

And I don’t think I need to explain further, do I?

 

Pro Tip: If you have forgotten to attach a resume to your email cover letter, don’t resend the whole message, just shoot a quick follow-up email with your resume attached. Would rather avoid this nightmare scenario? Attach all the necessary documents before you start writing a cover letter email.

 

One last thing to keep in mind:

 

Choose a professional file name for your resume attachment:

 

“[Your first and last names]-resume-[the company name],” for example: John-Smith-resume-Intel NOT My-resume-124.

 

Key Takeaway

 

To write a perfect cover letter email for a job application, follow these steps:

 

  • Use a clear, strong subject line.
  • Open with a proper greeting—address the hiring manager by their name.
  • In the first sentence, explain why you’re writing and what position you’re targeting.
  • Write a brief main paragraph that outlines your most relevant experience and achievements.
  • Close with a call to action—ask to schedule a meeting and reiterate your offer.
  • Sign-off with a “sincerely” synonym and your full name.
  • Put your contact details in the footer.
  • Don’t forget to attach a resume to your cover letter email!

 

And, for the final piece of advice:

 

Keep it short.

 

Got any additional questions about writing and sending a cover letter email? Want to share your experience with applying by a direct email message? Give me a shout in the comments. I can’t wait to hear out your thoughts. Let’s chat!

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: How to Write a Formal Letter

The main purpose of having business letter examples is to help you create your . to be able to understand what you are writing on about on the first glance.

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Written by Mukazahn
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