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Example letter of application for teaching job

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Example letter of application for teaching job
October 09, 2018 Anniversary Wishes 1 comment

When applying for a job, a cover letter should be submitted alongside your resume. For example, if you are applying for a role where you will be only teaching.

Write your teacher resume with the following tips in mind.

Write Quantified Professional Experience

Your professional experience will be listed in bullet points. Each bullet point should be relevant to the job that you’re applying for. If you’re hoping to get another job as a teacher, choose the best skills, abilities, and knowledge that you’ve accumulated through your experience.

Make sure that your bullet points are accomplishment-oriented and quantified.

If you’re hoping to get another job as a teacher, choose the best skills, abilities, and knowledge that you’ve accumulated through your experience.

For instance, in our English teacher sample resume, here’s an example of an accomplishment-oriented bullet point that is quantified.

Pay attention to the bold text:

  • Ensured that all students comprehended the curriculum, and supported students who required extra guidance, resulting in writing and reading comprehension test scores increasing 16% over three years on average

The candidate’s ability to raise test scores demonstrates that they are a skilled teacher and potentially valuable hire, especially given the current teaching climate in the US, which is increasingly test score oriented.

If you’re in a rush, we recommend using our resume builder software to quickly create resumes that will land you more interviews.

What if you lack accomplishments?

Many teachers face insurmountable obstacles including being underfunded, teaching in tough neighborhoods, and lacking support from administration. In other words, not everyone can increase test scores by 16% over three years on average, simply because reality won’t allow for it.

In that case, your resume can still be quantified by giving the hiring manager a concrete idea of the scope of your skills and abilities. For instance, you can quantify the number of students you work with per semester:

  • Assess and look after 150+ students’ progress throughout the term and work closely with other staff to efficiently plan and coordinate work

Or you can quantify the size of the school you work in:

  • …with curriculum objectives and assist students to prepare for examinations in a 2,500+ student school

Or you can quantify the number of people you trained, which indicates that you are knowledgeable, skilled, and trusted by management — excellent qualities to impress upon a hiring manager:

  • Trained four new preschool teachers, emphasizing the importance of classroom control…

The important thing to remember is that your bullet points should not be bland duties and responsibilities.

Mentioning any success with academic or athletic coaching is another great way to quantify your previous accomplishments.

Include your Certifications

Most teachers should list all of their certifications, or when they anticipate receiving them. This can either be done in a separate certifications section, or added to the additional skills section.

Certifications differ greatly between different states. You will need to be aware of how they are listed in your state. In our English teacher sample, the candidate is from Florida, where a middle school English teacher certification is called “Certification in Middle Grades English.”

To find out your state’s teaching requirement, stop by Teach.com’s “Where Can I Teach?” map for all the details you need to start your career.

Action Verbs for Teachers

AssessEducateMotivate
CollaborateEncourage Plan
CreateExploreShowcase
DevelopGradeTeach
DiscussInstructTutor

Like the list above? Find more at the longest action verb list in the universe.

How to Convey Entry-Level Teacher Resume Experience

If you are an entry-level teacher, then you’ve recently been through extensive training, including earning classroom experience through interactive field experience.

This experience should also be included in your professional experience section, but under a different subheading called “Interactive Field Experience”.

Create a subheading for each school where you earned field experience, and write your bullet points in the same way described in the above section — make sure they are targeted, quantified, specific, and impactful.

The final section of your resume is the skills section, which is detailed below.

Write a Targeted Skills Section

Teachers in the 21st century are expected to be competent with technology, such as using laptops, projectors, tablets, and software to increase student performance and engagement. Be sure to include this information on your resume.

Teachers in the 21st century are expected to be competent with technology, such as using laptops, projectors, tablets, and software to increase student performance and engagement.

Classroom software:

  • Pearson ECollege
  • Moodle Sakai
  • Lore
  • MyEdu
  • GoinGon
  • Instructable Canvas

Other Software Skills:

  • Microsoft Office
  • GIMP/Photoshop
  • Windows Movie Maker or iMovie

Research Skills:

  • Web browsing and online search abilities
  • JSTOR and other research tools
  • Google Scholar

Other Potential Sections for your Teacher Resume

Other information you could include on your resume: study abroad, relevant coursework, or academic awards and honors

One of the oldest and most reliable resources on the web for educators is Gradebook. Gradebook has all sorts of resources for all levels of educators. Categories are divided amongst educators, parents, students and subjects. This is a great place to start if you’re looking to get an overview on a broad range of educational subjects.

Finally, don’t get down about writing your teacher resume. You didn’t decide to become a teacher because you wanted to become rich, you did it because you have passion for education. As professor of economics Larry Smith of Waterloo University explains, “Never forget to hold to that passion!”

Whether it's your first teaching job or you're looking for a new position after years in the field, you'll need a letter of application, or cover letter.

CV and cover letter examples for teachers

example letter of application for teaching job

You’re ready to grab your students’ attentions and guide them through their formative scholastic years.

 

But, before you can do that, you’ve got to grab the principal’s attention in a similar way—

 

—with the perfect teacher cover letter.

 

That means treating it like a crucial final exam instead of an inconsequential pop quiz.

 

No worries.

 

With this guide, you'll make a teacher cover letter on which they’ll put an A++ and a big smiley face at the top.

 

This educational cover letter guide will show you:

 

  • Teacher cover letter examples better than 9 out of 10 other cover letters.
  • How to write a cover letter for a teaching job that will land you more interviews.
  • Cover letter examples for teachers on how to grab the principal’s attention.
  • How to sell your candidacy on a cover letter for teaching jobs to get any job you want.

 

Want to write your cover letter fast? Use our cover letter builder. Choose from 20+ professional cover letter templates that match your resume. See actionable examples and get expert tips along the way.

 

Sample Teacher Cover Letter —See more cover letter templates and create your cover letter here.

 

One of our users, Nikos, had this to say:

 

[I used] a nice template I found on Zety. My resume is now one page long, not three. With the same stuff.

 

Create your resume now

 

This guide works for elementary school and high school teachers—be they experienced or new first year teachers, substitute teachers, or TAs!

 

1

What’s the Best Structure for Teacher Cover Letters?

 

You've created a great teacher resume, and now it's time to write a cover letter for teaching jobs to attach alongside.

 

However, remember that your cover letter is still a formal letter. There’s a recommended layout to be followed. But what does that structure look like, and what should you include on a teacher’s cover letter?

 

Here’s what should be included on teacher cover letters:

 

  • your contact information, including the date you're writing it,
  • the school’s (addressee’s) details,
  • a greeting / salutation (e.g., Dear Principal Johnson,),
  • an opening statement that grabs their attention,
  • short paragraph on why you’re perfect for the school,
  • short paragraph on why the teaching position is perfect for you,
  • closing statement that seals the deal
  • complimentary close (e.g., Regards, Sincerely) and your name
  • a postscript (P.S.).

 

Here, we’re following our recommended structure on the elements of the perfect cover letter for teaching jobs. To read more about the method behind our madness, see this article: What to Include in a Cover Letter

 

2

How to Address Your Teaching Cover Letter

 

A teaching cover letter begins at the top with the heading area. This is where you’ll put your personal information, and its look and design may vary depending on the cover letter template that you use.

 

Your Details

 

First, add your contact info at the top of the cover letter. Must-haves include your name, email address, and phone number. Optional items are your mailing address, social handles, and a LinkedIn profile URL. As the addresser, your address can be aligned to the left, center, or right; I’d suggest sticking to the design of your resume.

 

The Date

 

Inserting the date of writing is necessary on any formal letter such as an educator’s cover letter.

 

The School’s Details

 

Next, add the addressee, which, if you can find it, is the specific name of the superintendent or principal. Follow that with the school or academy you’re applying at and its address.

 

Here’s what the finished cover letter address area could look like:

Not addressing your cover letter correctly is just as detention-worthy as not including one at all. Make sure you get yours right, whether it’s a teaching assistant cover letter, substitute teacher cover letter, or other such letters of interest: How to Address a Cover Letter

 

3

Starting Off Your Cover Letter for Teachers on the Right Foot

 

Learning how to open a cover letter for teachers is super important to get right, as its top location gets the most eye time.

 

Greeting / Salutation

 

On your teaching cover letter, call them by name. Something like “Dear Principal Jackson,” works just perfectly, but you can also segue from the formality in the address area by calling them by their first name: “Dear Jacqueline,”.

 

Now, what about that “Dear” part? Dear is one of the best cover letter salutations, but there are alternatives. Read: How to Start a Cover Letter

 

Introductory Statement

 

Like the first line in a well-written novel for a book report, the opening paragraph should hook the principal immediately in a way that makes them want to hear more.

 

Let’s look at an example of a great elementary teacher cover letter opening:

 

As a veteran elementary school teacher and tutor, I was excited to see the opening for a tenth-grade world history teacher at Smith High School. With my experience as a top fourth-grade instructor at Smith Elementary, I know I can use my teaching skills and knowledge to become a valuable member of the Smith HS faculty.

 

How's that?

 

The sample teacher cover letter introduction is written to the school, specifically (notice the school's name mentioned). 

 

It also works because it gives them an inkling of why you'd be the perfect teaching addition to the department. 

 

Pro Tip: As you called out their name in the address, mention the school’s name in the opening paragraph, as well. It feels more personalized, and it assures the principal that they’re reading a dedicated cover letter.

 

For other ways to go about your introductory statement, see: How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter

 

When making a resume in our builder, drag & drop bullet points, skills, and auto-fill the boring stuff. Spell check? Check. Start building your resume here.

When you’re done, Zety’s resume builder will score your resume and tell you exactly how to make it better.

 

4

The Middle of Your Teacher Cover Letter: You + School = Perfect Partnership

 

Time to sell them on why you’re the perfect teaching candidate out of that stack of 250 others the way your best pupils perform in the school fundraiser.

 

But don’t worry. The next two areas (we suggest a paragraph for each) of your cover letter for teacher's position give you plenty of real estate to make your case. Though they’re opposites, these sections have a symbiotic, yin-yang-type relationship, like a compass and protractor.

 

Why You’re Perfect for Them

 

You’ve got them hooked. Time to reel them in with your teacher cover letter.

 

Show them how you are the perfect fit for the school and faculty.

 

Here’s what an applicant might say on a sample school teacher cover letter:

 

In my previous position with Smith Elementary, I’ve had many responsibilities and achievements that would serve me well as an educator of world history at Smith High. I created lesson plans for world history at Smith Elementary using a format similar to the one at Smith HS, and it has now been adopted by 19 out of 22 school districts in our state. On top of that, my 98.5% passing and graduation rates there were among the best in the school district, and I’m sure that I could garner similar results at Smith High School.

 

See that? With that paragraph, you show that your acquired skills and experience would make you the ideal new hire for the teaching job offered.

 

Pro Tip: Remember using keywords on your resume to ensure that it’s tailored? Add them on your teaching cover letter, as well. Oh, and make sure you use the best cover letter fonts so they can read it!

 

Why They’re Perfect for You

 

You told them why you’re the best possible future faculty member, so now it’s time to explain why this school is the perfect choice for you:

 

Obtaining the world history teaching position at Smith High School would be my dream come true. I’ve long been a fan of your teaching values. In fact, several members of the Smith HS faculty were the ones who initially encouraged me to become an instructor. Though I love teaching students with all my heart, there is no other school that would make me as happy to work for. I know, should I be honored with the position, that I’d be the envy of the school board!

 

How about that? You praised the learning institution and explained why they are the center of your educational universe - who can resist that?

 

We’ve got a wealth of tips on these two central paragraphs and on writing a cover letter for teaching jobs that will let you stand out: 35+ Successful Cover Letter Tips, Advice & Guidelines

 

Pro Tip: Say you want to apply at a school, but there are no academic jobs listed. This is when you send what’s called a letter of interest for teaching positions, also known as a letter of inquiry. A teaching letter of interest is a specific type of teacher’s cover letter that inquires about possible availability in the school without the awareness that an open teaching position exists.

 

If you are a teacher who needs to write a letter of interest, have a look at this guide: How to Write a Letter of Interest [Complete Guide & 15+ Examples]

 

5

Add a Compelling & Strong Finish to Your Cover Letter for Teachers

 

You started off strong, and you kept that momentum going throughout.

 

Now, don’t quit just yet—it’s time to summon a second wind and cross that finish line in first place with a powerful closing statement of your teacher cover letter.

 

Use a closing sentence or paragraph to briefly sum up:

 

I would welcome the chance to discuss your current world history syllabus and show you how my successes at Smith Elementary can translate into success at Smith High.

 

See that? You bring it to a satisfying end by summarizing your academic cover letter and then leaving the ball in their court.

 

Complimentary Close

 

Add a closing sentiment and your name, and then you can let out a sigh of contentment at your accomplishment, like one of your kids when they finally finish their homework for a three-day weekend.

 

Here’s how easy that is:

 

Sincerely,

 

Jill Santos

 

Not much to it, right? That closing sentiment (“Sincerely” in this case) is called a complimentary close (or complimentary closing), which is then followed by your name to end the cover letter.

 

Closing strong on a cover letter for teaching positions is just as critical as an attention-grabbing beginning. Read this for more examples: How to End a Cover Letter: Sample & Complete Guide

 

6

Don't Forget to Add a Postscript to Seal the Deal (Teacher Cover Letter Hack)

 

I know, I know, I said that was it. But hear me out for just one final moment, if you will.

 

Adding a P.S., though not necessary, is a great hack when writing a cover letter for teaching jobs. Every great teacher cover letter should include a postscript.

 

Let me show you what I mean:

 

P.S. I’d love the opportunity to sit down with you and go over how I can bring similar results (45% reduced tardiness) to Smith High School, as well.

 

What do you think? A P.S. (postscript) at the bottom of your cover letter for teachers always draws the attention of the reader, even if they don’t read the rest of it. It’s a clever way to get one last word in edgewise before they finish.

 

Key Takeaway

 

As you can see, writing cover letters for teachers is certainly not as complicated as you thought—and definitely nowhere near as tough as the magic you’ll perform each day on the job.

 

Remember to follow these key points for a successful teaching cover letter:

 

  • Start with a bang - Your opening statement on your cover letter for teaching jobs is important because it’ll determine if the principal reads on.
  • Show you belong together - Use the majority of the body area to show that you’re a perfect fit for the school and they’re the ideal workplace for you.
  • Finish strong - You held their attention till the final bell, but use a strong ending so they’ll be sure to move on to your resume and an academic interview.

 

Now, just email your resume off and prepare for the interview!

 

Any questions on how to write a teaching cover letter? Not sure how to address a cover letter, start your body paragraphs, or end your cover letter in a strong way? Get at us in the comments below, and we’ll answer your question. Thanks for reading!

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6+ Sample Job Application Letters for Teachers

example letter of application for teaching job

Read Time: 6 Minutes

By Lynda Galea

Dust off that old cover letter you have sitting around on your desktop - it's time to give it a facelift! Cover letters are usually boring, bland and if you're anything like a majority of the job-seeking market, you send the same one around to every company you apply to... but that's about to change! Enter, a cover letter tailored specifically for that teaching English online job and school you want to apply to work at. You're about to knock their socks off!

The Cover Letter

When applying for a job, a cover letter should be submitted alongside your resume. A cover letter is typically one page in length and explains to your potential employer why you are an ideal candidate for the job. It goes beyond your resume to explain how you could add value to the company in which you are applying.

Your cover letter should highlight any educational and teaching-related experiences that you may have to offer. You should also highlight any previous experience you have teaching English as a second language, as well as your desire to provide your students with a quality educational experience and your commitment to professionalism. 

A common error that many teachers make when applying to teach English online is sending a generic cover letter. This means they are using the exact same cover letter to apply for a plethora of jobs, even though the jobs are for a range of different schools. While a generic cover letter is more times than not adequate, having a cover letter that is tailored to the specific school you are applying to and the age group of students you will be teaching will help set you apart from the competition.

Another way to stand out from the crowd is to highlight what differentiates you from other online English teachers. For example, if you are applying for a role where you will be only teaching children, try to keep your cover letter focused on this. Perhaps mention that you have a colorful, clutter-free dedicated space for your classroom and many fun props to attract a child’s attention and make learning fun. Similarly, if you are applying for a role with an adult-teaching platform, you will want to tailor your cover letter to focus on teaching English to adults instead. 

Cover Letter Formatting

Your cover letter should be a clean, simple, modern design. The most important thing is that your font is easy to read. Times New Roman is commonly viewed as a classic resume font, but it is also dated and can be considered boring. Try using clean, sleek fonts like Calibri, Arial, or Verdana to give a more tightened-up presentation.

Text should be black or grayscale and the use of bolded font is not necessary in a cover letter as the need for headings or subheadings doesn't exist. You’ll also want your cover letter format and text to match that of your resume. Although we do not discuss resumes in this post, this is something you should already be thinking about. Learn how you can create a killer resume for teaching English online.  

Cover Letter Requirements for Teaching English Online

Your teaching English online cover letter should include the following:

→ You'll want to mention where you are located and whether your location is stable or if you are constantly moving around (i.e.: a digital nomad). This can be as simple as listing your address at the top of the page.

→ A brief explanation of your interest in education and teaching English.

→ How and why you are interested in working for that school.

→ Mention whether you're a native or non-naitve English speaker.

→ Make note of what accent you have (i.e.: If you are American, then list that you have an American accent). Some schools give preference to the type of accent you have.

→ Education. Include your TEFL Certification and where/when it was obtained.

→ Any prior teaching or international experience you have.

→ Specific skills you may offer that pertain to teaching ESL to the age group in question.

→ When you are able to begin teaching English online and your ability to fulfil any minimum contract agreements.

→ List the make/model of your computer/laptop, amount of memory, operating system, processor speed, etc. If your laptop has an in-built webcam, make note that it's inbuilt, or if you use an external webcam, list the make and model. Also list the name and model of your headset. A quality headset will do you wonders.

→ The speed of your Internet connection and whether it is wired or wireless. You can take a speed test and link to it to show your speed results. 

→ If you already have a dedicated space set up for your classroom, reference it as well as any teaching English online classroom props you may have.

→ Limit your cover letter to one page in length.

Example Cover Letter for Teaching English Online

Based on the guidelines provided above, here's an example of what a cover letter tailored specifically for teaching English online may look like. *Please Note: VIPKid does not actually require you to submit a cover letter or resume, but instead requires you to fill out an online application.*

Bear in mind, this isn't the holy grail of cover letter design and layouts - feel free to layout your cover letter however you want, but just be sure to revert back to our formatting guidelines above to keep your cover letter uniform.

Saving Your Cover Letter 

Save your cover letter as your last name, first name, online school name, and then what the file is. Example file name: 

Anderson, Tiffany - <Online School Name> Cover Letter

Be sure to save your cover letter as both a Word Doc (so you can edit it later if need be) and as a PDF doc (this is the version you will submit during the application process). 

.

Next Steps

Great – you have your cover letter all sorted, now you need to get your resume in order. Check out our post on how to create a killer resume for teaching English online.

 

 BACK TO TEACH ENGLISH ONLINE CORNER 

 

About the Author: An accomplished traveler (she's visited 35 countries!) and blogger, Lynda Galea hails from Melbourne, Australia. When she's not working with the ITA team spreading the word about teaching and traveling abroad, Lynda enjoys taking in a new film, eating dumplings, and of course, snuggling with her beloved kitty, Sooty.


Want to Learn More about Teaching English Online?

If you are excited about teaching English from either the comfort of your own home or anywhere in the world, contact us about TEFL certification options and get ready for a great adventure!

Related Resources:

Below you'll find various teacher resume examples, as well as writing tips and tricks . Each bullet point should be relevant to the job that you're applying for.

Before you apply: teaching application form and CV checklist

example letter of application for teaching job

Quite simply, teachers rock. They give us so many of the tools we need to get by in life, and in the most Hollywood-ready moments, inspire us to get into poetry and stand on desks. But while we, as a society, see teachers at the head of the classroom, imparting the knowledge one needs to get by in this world, we might not think of the hiring process it takes to get there. But the reality is that every teacher had to go through the very ordinary hiring process to get their jobs, just like everyone else. If you’re a teacher, you want your cover letter to rock every bit as much as you do.

First let’s start with the basics of a good cover letter, and what that means for your job search as an educator.

Necessity #1: A Personalized Introduction

If you’re a teacher, your most basic goal is (most likely) to get a job teaching. Great—it’s the same goal as every other person applying for this open position. Your more specific goal with your cover letter is to make sure that your name and qualifications are as memorable as possible, setting a tone that the reader can carry over into reading your resume. This means that you need to engage the reader up front.

Whenever possible, make sure you’re addressing your letter (or email, if you’re being all modern about it) to someone specific. Before you start putting together your resume/cover letter package, do a little legwork about who will likely be reading this. If the job listing includes a specific name, great! You’re all set. If not, it’s worth doing a little digging online to see who will be on the receiving end.

It’s also important to use the right tone. Definitely don’t go too casual. The fact that you’re likely submitting these online, or writing an email, can lead to a false sense of shortcut familiarity. So even if you’re submitting your cover letter and resume digitally, treat the email like a regular letter.

Potential Obstacle

You’re working with an entirely online application process, with no visibility into who might be reading this. If that’s the case, and all you know is the school or school system where you’re applying, try to find information online about who has hiring responsibility for the school district. If that, too fails, go with a generic address like, “Greetings.” It’s not ideal, but it feels less stiff and formal than the old favorite, “to whom it may concern.”

Good salutation examples:

  • Dear Ms. Rodriguez,
  • Dear Principal Rodriguez,
  • Greetings, Ms. Rodriguez,

Bad salutation examples:

  • Dear Mudville Public Schools Administrator (too vague/impersonal)
  • To Ms. Rodriguez, Superintendent of Mudville Public Schools (too formal—you’re not introducing royalty at a state dinner)
  • Hi: (too impersonal/casual)
  • To Whom It May Concern: (too formal/too impersonal)

You want your cover letter to seem professional, but approachable. The salutation helps set that tone. If you make it seem too much like an impersonal form letter, or the stiff letter of a person who is uncomfortable talking about this job application, you run the risk of not engaging the reader. And I think we all know what happens to application packages that don’t engage the reader. (Spoiler alert: they don’t get read.)

Necessity #2: Your Elevator Pitch

You’re an educator. You teach. That may be your elevator pitch in its simplest form, but this is your chance to add some necessary color. You should also be very specific about which position for which you’re applying, because there may be other openings in a variety of different teaching roles. If you think you’re applying for the high school English job and somehow your application gets routed to the pile for the elementary school gym teacher position, your very specific letter ensures that you’ll get to the right hands. Your resume would likely do this as well, but this helps the reader know up front that what position you’re seeking, and why.

And above all, make sure you’re proofreading your letter—and ideally, having a trusted friend look at it as well to make sure you haven’t missed anything. Unfairly or not, teachers are held to the highest standards of grammar and written communication, regardless of whether they teach writing or physics. You know and I know that teachers are human, and prone to mistakes like the rest of us, but you can avoid a lot uncomfortable, unforced errors by adding some extra care with your cover letter.

Good pitch example:

As a secondary math teacher for more than 10 years, I’ve found that my passion for (and commitment to teaching) have only grown with every year. Even with the complexities of the current educational landscape, the feeling of getting through to that student who just wasn’t “getting the hang of it,” or helping advanced students achieve their goals, never gets old. I have dedicated my career to helping students of all levels master the math skills and concepts they need to go on to college and everyday life beyond high school, and would love to continue that path with Mudville High School.

In my current position, I teach algebra, pre-calculus, and calculus to students in grades 9 through 12. Over my ten years of teaching, I’ve made it a point to stay up to date on the most current pedagogy and teaching methods, and use custom lesson planning to develop relevant curricula for students in order to maximize their engagement on complex concepts. I’ve also presented on curriculum planning at the National Federation of Teachers conference, and would bring that enthusiasm and expertise to your school.

Bad pitch examples:

I would love to teach at your school. Please see my attached CV, and let me know if you have any questions.

This is way too little information. Who are you? What experience do you bring? What are you hoping to accomplish in this job? It shouldn’t be a novel about your life, but you should be providing some context for your resume.

Teaching has been my only consuming passion in life. I eat, drink, sleep, and breathe calculus, and will not rest until all of my students are proficient. I have ten years of experience, and will bring nothing but focus and devotion to my next ten years as a math teacher at Mudville High School.

Too…intense. You want to position yourself as a strong candidate, but that doesn’t mean you have to pretend that you don’t have outside skills, interests, or…down time. Readers can see through hyperbole, so it’s best to find a balance between enthusiasm (a necessary part of any job application) and an exaggerated over-sell.

Necessity #3: A Strong Finish

Always have a closing that leaves room for follow-up. Yes, the reader knows that they can email you with any questions, but it’s a conversational way to close out the letter and move the reader on to your resume.

Good closing example:

I would love to continue my career as an educator with Mudville Public Schools, with its strong reputation for putting students first. If you have any additional questions or if there’s any additional information I can provide, please don’t hesitate to let me know. I look forward to hearing more about this teaching opportunity.

Bad closing examples:

  • Please let me know more about this job opening. Thanks.
  • I expect to hear from you within a week. Thank you.

In these examples, one teacher suggests that she has put thought and consideration into applying for this particular job. The other teachers, well…one closes with the most generic exit possible, and this adds nothing to the cover letter. In the second bad example, it comes off as too demanding, like the writer is evaluating the reader, not vice versa. I know it can be frustrating when you send your application package into the void and don’t hear back right away, but demanding a response doesn’t guarantee you’ll get one.

A strong closing is important, as it’s one of the few remaining elements between the cover and the resume.

Necessity #4: Keep It Clean

Like with your resume, you want your cover letter to be clear and easy to read. That means:

  • A standard font. This is not the time to test out “fun” fonts. Pick something clean and basic, like Times.
  • No huge blocks of text. In a letter, unbroken paragraphs can look like the ramblings of a manifesto. You want your reader to see a series of separate, elegantly outlined points. Short paragraphs, 2-3 at most.
  • Short length. A cover letter should never be more than a page, and even a full page is definitely pushing it. Brevity is the soul of wit, and the friend of application readers everywhere.

Good letter body example:

As a secondary math teacher for more than 10 years, I’ve found that my passion for (and commitment to teaching) have only grown with every year. Even with the complexities of the current educational landscape, the feeling of getting through to that student who just wasn’t “getting the hang of it,” or helping advanced students achieve their goals, never gets old. I have dedicated my career to helping students of all levels master the math skills and concepts they need to go on to college and everyday life beyond high school, and would love to continue that path with Mudville High School.

In my current position, I teach algebra, pre-calculus, and calculus to students in grades 9 through 12. Over my ten years of teaching, I’ve made it a point to stay up to date on the most current pedagogy and teaching methods, and use custom lesson planning to develop relevant curricula for students in order to maximize their engagement on complex concepts. I’ve also presented on curriculum planning at the National Federation of Teachers conference, and would bring that enthusiasm and expertise to your school.

I would love continue my career as an educator with Mudville Public Schools, with its strong reputation for putting students first. If you have any additional questions or if there’s any additional information I can provide, please don’t hesitate to let me know. I look forward to hearing more about this teaching opportunity.

Bad letter body example:

As a secondary math teacher for more than 10 years, I’ve found that my passion for (and commitment to teaching) have only grown with every year. Even with the complexities of the current educational landscape, the feeling of getting through to that student who just wasn’t “getting the hang of it,” or helping advanced students achieve their goals, never gets old. I have dedicated my career to helping students of all levels master the math skills and concepts they need to go on to college and everyday life beyond high school, and would love to continue that path with Mudville High School. In my current position, I teach algebra, pre-calculus, and calculus to students in grades 9 through 12. Over my ten years of teaching, I’ve made it a point to stay up to date on the most current pedagogy and teaching methods, and use custom lesson planning to develop relevant curricula for students in order to maximize their engagement on complex concepts. I’ve also presented on curriculum planning at the National Federation of Teachers conference, and would bring that enthusiasm and expertise to your school. I would love continue my career as an educator with Mudville Public Schools, with its strong reputation for putting students first. If you have any additional questions or if there’s any additional information I can provide, please don’t hesitate to let me know. I look forward to hearing more about this teaching opportunity.

One of these letters is clear and readable. The other is not. If the reader can’t get through your letter and know several things about you right away, it decreases the odds that your resume will click with him or her—and may even prevent someone from looking at the attached resume at all.

Once you’ve got the body of the letter in shape, all that’s left is the closing. Like the salutation, you want to err on the side of formal, but friendly.

Good closing examples:

Bad examples:

  • Thanks. (brusque tone)
  • Fondest wishes, (too flowery)
  • [name—no greeting] (too abrupt)
  • Let me know, (too informal and oddly personal)

And with that, you’ve got your cover letter! Teachers are taking on an incredible commitment, and that means that those hiring them are looking for the most put-together, obviously qualified applicants available. You can have an amazing resume, but if you aren’t making your case with your cover letter, you’re missing out on an opportunity to really set the narrative and the tone for your application.

Let’s take a last look at the good sample cover letter as a whole:

Dear Principal Rodriquez,

As a secondary math teacher for more than 10 years, I’ve found that my passion for (and commitment to teaching) have only grown with every year. Even with the complexities of the current educational landscape, the feeling of getting through to that student who just wasn’t “getting the hang of it,” or helping advanced students achieve their goals, never gets old. I have dedicated my career to helping students of all levels master the math skills and concepts they need to go on to college and everyday life beyond high school, and would love to continue that path with Mudville High School.

In my current position, I teach algebra, pre-calculus, and calculus to students in grades 9 through 12. Over my ten years of teaching, I’ve made it a point to stay up to date on the most current pedagogy and teaching methods, and use custom lesson planning to develop relevant curricula for students in order to maximize their engagement on complex concepts. I’ve also presented on curriculum planning at the National Federation of Teachers conference, and would bring that enthusiasm and expertise to your school.

I would love continue my career as an educator with Mudville Public Schools, with its strong reputation for putting students first. If you have any additional questions or if there’s any additional information I can provide, please don’t hesitate to let me know. Thanks for your consideration, and I look forward to hearing more about this teaching opportunity.

Sincerely,

Rosemarie Jones

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