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Reply to request for information

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Reply to request for information
August 18, 2019 Anniversary Wishes 4 comments

Useful phrases: Please find enclosed a Regarding your request for In response to your enquiry about May I bring to your attention The following.

ByKayceBasques

Technical Writer, Chrome DevTools & Lighthouse

Discover new ways to analyze how your page loads in this comprehensive reference of Chrome DevTools network analysis features.

Note: This reference is based on Chrome 58. If you use another version of Chrome, the UI and features of DevTools may be different. Check to see what version of Chrome you're running.

Record network requests

By default, DevTools records all network requests in the Network panel, so long as DevTools is open.

Stop recording network requests

To stop recording requests:

  • Click Stop recording network log on the Network panel. It turns grey to indicate that DevTools is no longer recording requests.
  • Press + (Mac) or + (Windows, Linux) while the Network panel is in focus.

Clear requests

Click Clear on the Network panel to clear all requests from the Requests table.

Save requests across page loads

To save requests across page loads, check the Preserve log checkbox on the Network panel. DevTools saves all requests until you disable Preserve log.

Capture screenshots during page load

Capture screenshots to analyze what users see as they wait for your page to load.

To enable screenshots, click Capture screenshots on the Network panel. It turns blue when enabled.

Reload the page while the Network panel is in focus to capture screenshots.

Once captured, you can interact with screenshots in the following ways:

  • Hover over a screenshot to view the point at which that screenshot was captured. A yellow line appears on the Overview pane.
  • Click a screenshot's thumbnail to filter out any requests that occurred after the screenshot was captured.
  • Double-click a thumbnail to zoom in on it.

Replay XHR request

To replay an XHR request, right-click the request in the Requests table and select Replay XHR.

Change loading behavior

Emulate a first-time visitor by disabling the browser cache

To emulate how a first-time user experiences your site, check the Disable cache checkbox. DevTools disables the browser cache. This more accurately emulates a first-time user's experience, because requests are served from the browser cache on repeat visits.

Disable the browser cache from the Network Conditions drawer

If you want to disable the cache while working in other DevTools panels, use the Network Conditions drawer.

  1. Open the Network Conditions drawer.
  2. Check or uncheck the Disable cache checkbox.

Manually clear the browser cache

To manually clear the browser cache at any time, right-click anywhere in the Requests table and select Clear Browser Cache.

Emulate offline

There's a new class of web apps, called Progressive Web Apps, which can function offline with the help of service workers. When you're building this type of app, it's useful to be able to quickly simulate a device that has no data connection.

Check the Offline checkbox to simulate a completely offline network experience.

Emulate slow network connections

Emulate 2G, 3G, and other connection speeds from the Network Throttling menu.

You can select from a variety of presets, such as Regular or Good 2G. You can also add your own custom presets by opening the Network Throttling menu and selecting Custom > Add.

DevTools displays a warning icon next to the Network tab to remind you that throttling is enabled.

Emulate slow network connections from the Network Conditions drawer

If you want to throttle the network connection while working in other DevTools panels, use the Network Conditions drawer.

  1. Open the Network Conditions drawer.
  2. Select your desired connection speed from the Network Throttling menu.

Manually clear browser cookies

To manually clear browser cookies at any time, right-click anywhere in the Requests table and select Clear Browser Cookies.

Override the user agent

To manually override the user agent:

  1. Open the Network Conditions drawer.
  2. Uncheck Select automatically.
  3. Choose a user agent option from the menu, or enter a custom one in the text box.

Filter requests

Filter requests by properties

Use the Filter text box to filter requests by properties, such as the domain or size of the request.

If you can't see the text box, the Filters pane is probably hidden. See Hide the Filters pane.

You can use multiple properties simultaneously by separating each property with a space. For example, displays all GIFs that are larger than one kilobyte. These multi-property filters are equivalent to AND operations. OR operations are currently not supported.

Below is a complete list of supported properties.

  • . Only display resources from the specified domain. You can use a wildcard character () to include multiple domains. For example, displays resources from all domain names ending in . DevTools populates the autocomplete dropdown menu with all of the domains it has encountered.
  • . Show the resources that contain the specified HTTP response header. DevTools populates the autocomplete dropdown with all of the response headers that it has encountered.
  • . Use to find resources.
  • . Show resources that are larger than the specified size, in bytes. Setting a value of is equivalent to setting a value of .
  • . Show resources that were retrieved over a specified HTTP method type. DevTools populates the dropdown with all of the HTTP methods it has encountered.
  • . Show resources of a specified MIME type. DevTools populates the dropdown with all MIME types it has encountered.
  • . Show all mixed content resources () or just the ones that are currently displayed ().
  • . Show resources retrieved over unprotected HTTP () or protected HTTPS ().
  • . Show the resources that have a header with a attribute that matches the specified value. DevTools populates the autocomplete with all of the cookie domains that it has encountered.
  • . Show the resources that have a header with a name that matches the specified value. DevTools populates the autocomplete with all of the cookie names that it has encountered.
  • . Show the resources that have a header with a value that matches the specified value. DevTools populates the autocomplete with all of the cookie values that it has encountered.
  • . Only show resources whose HTTP status code match the specified code. DevTools populates the autocomplete dropdown menu with all of the status codes it has encountered.

Filter requests by type

To filter requests by request type, click the XHR, JS, CSS, Img, Media, Font, Doc, WS (WebSocket), Manifest, or Other (any other type not listed here) buttons on the Network panel.

If you can't see these buttons, the Filters pane is probably hidden. See Hide the Filters pane.

To enable multiple type filters simultaneously, hold (Mac) or (Windows, Linux) and then click.

Filter requests by time

Click and drag left or right on the Overview pane to only display requests that were active during that time frame. The filter is inclusive. Any request that was active during the highlighted time is shown.

Hide data URLs

Data URLs are small files embedded into other documents. Any request that you see in the Requests table that starts with is a data URL.

Check the Hide data URLs checkbox to hide these requests.

Sort requests

By default, the requests in the Requests table are sorted by initiation time, but you can sort the table using other criteria.

Sort by column

Click the header of any column in the Requests to sort requests by that column.

Sort by activity phase

To change how the Waterfall sorts requests, right-click the header of the Requests table, hover over Waterfall, and select one of the following options:

  • Start Time. The first request that was initiated is at the top.
  • Response Time. The first request that started downloading is at the top.
  • End Time. The first request that finished is at the top.
  • Total Duration. The request with the shortest connection setup and request / response is at the top.
  • Latency. The request that waited the shortest time for a response is at the top.

These descriptions assume that each respective option is ranked from shortest to longest. Clicking on the Waterfall column's header reverses the order.

Analyze requests

So long as DevTools is open, it logs all requests in the Network panel. Use the Network panel to analyze requests.

View a log of requests

Use the Requests table to view a log of all requests made while DevTools has been open. Clicking or hovering over requests reveals more information about them.

The Requests table displays the following columns by default:

  • Name. The filename of, or an identifier for, the resource.
  • Status. The HTTP status code.
  • Type. The MIME type of the requested resource.
  • Initiator. The following objects or processes can initiate requests:
    • Parser. Chrome's HTML parser.
    • Redirect. An HTTP redirect.
    • Script. A JavaScript function.
    • Other. Some other process or action, such as navigating to a page via a link or entering a URL in the address bar.
  • Size. The combined size of the response headers plus the response body, as delivered by the server.
  • Time. The total duration, from the start of the request to the receipt of the final byte in the response.
  • Waterfall. A visual breakdown of each request's activity.

Add or remove columns

Right-click the header of the Requests table and select an option to hide or show it. Currently displayed options have checkmarks next to them.

Add custom columns

To add a custom column to the Requests table, right-click the header of the Requests table and select Response Headers > Manage Header Columns.

View the timing of requests in relation to one another

Use the Waterfall to view the timing of requests in relation to one another. By default, the Waterfall is organized by the start time of the requests. So, requests that are farther to the left started earlier than those that are farther to the right.

See Sort by activity phase to see the different ways that you can sort the Waterfall.

Analyze the frames of a WebSocket Connection

To view the frames of a WebSocket connection:

  1. Click the URL of the WebSocket connection, under the Name column of the Requests table.
  2. Click the Frames tab. The table shows the last 100 frames.

To refresh the table, re-click the name of the WebSocket connection under the Name column of the Requests table.

The table contains three columns:

  • Data. The message payload. If the message is plain text, it's displayed here. For binary opcodes, this column displays the opcode's name and code. The following opcodes are supported: Continuation Frame, Binary Frame, Connection Close Frame, Ping Frame, and Pong Frame.
  • Length. The length of the message payload, in bytes.
  • Time. The time when the message was received or sent.

Messages are color-coded according to their type:

  • Outgoing text messages are light-green.
  • Incoming text messages are white.
  • WebSocket opcodes are light-yellow.
  • Errors are light-red.

View a preview of a response body

To view a preview of a response body:

  1. Click the URL of the request, under the Name column of the Requests table.
  2. Click the Preview tab.

This tab is mostly useful for viewing images.

View a response body

To view the response body to a request:

  1. Click the URL of the request, under the Name column of the Requests table.
  2. Click the Response tab.

To view HTTP header data about a request:

  1. Click on the URL of the request, under the Name column of the Requests table.
  2. Click the Headers tab.

By default, the Headers tab shows header names alphabetically. To view the HTTP header names in the order they were received:

  1. Open the Headers tab for the request you're interested in. See View HTTP headers.
  2. Click view source, next to the Request Header or Response Header section.

View query string parameters

To view the query string parameters of a URL in a human-readable format:

  1. Open the Headers tab for the request you're interested in. See View HTTP headers.
  2. Go to the Query String Parameters section.

View query string parameters source

To view the query string parameter source of a request:

  1. Go to the Query String Parameters section. See View query string parameters.
  2. Click view source.

View URL-encoded query string parameters

To view query string parameters in a human-readable format, but with encodings preserved:

  1. Go to the Query String Parameters section. See View query string parameters.
  2. Click view URL encoded.

View cookies

To view the cookies sent in a request's HTTP header:

  1. Click the URL of the request, under the Name column of the Requests table.
  2. Click the Cookies tab.

See Fields for a description of each of the columns.

View the timing breakdown of a request

To view the timing breakdown of a request:

  1. Click the URL of the request, under the Name column of the Requests table.
  2. Click the Timing tab.

See Preview a timing breakdown for a faster way to access this data.

See Timing breakdown phases explained for more information about each of the phases that you may see in the Timing tab.

Here's more information about each of the phases.

See View timing breakdown for another way to access this view.

Preview a timing breakdown

To view a preview of the timing breakdown of a request, hover over the request's entry in the Waterfall column of the Requests table.

See View the timing breakdown of a request for a way to access this data that does not require hovering.

Timing breakdown phases explained

Here's more information about each of the phases you may see in the Timing tab:

  • Queueing. The browser queues requests when:
    • There are higher priority requests.
    • There are already six TCP connections open for this origin, which is the limit. Applies to HTTP/1.0 and HTTP/1.1 only.
    • The browser is briefly allocating space in the disk cache
  • Stalled. The request could be stalled for any of the reasons described in Queueing.
  • DNS Lookup. The browser is resolving the request's IP address.
  • Proxy negotiation. The browser is negotiating the request with a proxy server.
  • Request sent. The request is being sent.
  • ServiceWorker Preparation. The browser is starting up the service worker.
  • Request to ServiceWorker. The request is being sent to the service worker.
  • Waiting (TTFB). The browser is waiting for the first byte of a response. TTFB stands for Time To First Byte. This timing includes 1 round trip of latency and the time the server took to prepare the response.
  • Content Download. The browser is receiving the response.
  • Receiving Push. The browser is receiving data for this response via HTTP/2 Server Push.
  • Reading Push. The browser is reading the local data previously received.

View initiators and dependencies

To view the initiators and dependencies of a request, hold and hover over the request in the Requests table. DevTools colors initiators green, and dependencies red.

When the Requests table is ordered chronologically, the first green request above the request that you're hovering over is the initiator of the dependency. If there's another green request above that, that higher request is the initiator of the initiator. And so on.

View load events

DevTools displays the timing of the and events in multiple places on the Network panel. The event is colored blue, and the event is red.

View the total number of requests

The total number of requests is listed in the Summary pane, at the bottom of the Network panel.

Caution: This number only tracks requests that have been logged since DevTools was opened. If other requests occurred before DevTools was opened, those requests aren't counted.

View the total download size

The total download size of requests is listed in the Summary pane, at the bottom of the Network panel.

Caution: This number only tracks requests that have been logged since DevTools was opened. If other requests occurred before DevTools was opened, those requests aren't counted.

See View the uncompressed size of a resource to see how large resources are after the browser uncompresses them.

View the stack trace that caused a request

When a JavaScript statement causes a resource to be requested, hover over the Initiator column to view the stack trace leading up to the request.

View the uncompressed size of a resource

Click Use Large Request Rows and then look at the bottom value of the Size column.

Export requests data

Save all network requests to a HAR file

To save all network requests to a HAR file:

  1. Right-click any request in the Requests table.
  2. Select Save as HAR with Content. DevTools saves all requests that have occurred since you opened DevTools to the HAR file. There is no way to filter requests, or to save just a single request.

Once you've got a HAR file, you can import it back into DevTools for analysis. Just drag-and-drop the HAR file into the Requests table. See also [HAR Analyzer]HAR Analyzer.

Copy one or more requests to the clipboard

Under the Name column of the Requests table, right-click a request, hover over Copy, and select one of the following options:

  • Copy Link Address. Copy the request's URL to the clipboard.
  • Copy Response. Copy the response body to the clipboard.
  • Copy as cURL. Copy the request as a cURL command.
  • Copy All as cURL. Copy all requests as a chain of cURL commands.
  • Copy All as HAR. Copy all requests as HAR data.

Change the layout of the Network panel

Expand or collapse sections of the Network panel UI to focus on what's important to you.

Hide the Filters pane

By default, DevTools shows the Filters pane. Click Filter to hide it.

Use large request rows

Use large rows when you want more whitespace in your network requests table. Some columns also provide a little more information when using large rows. For example, the bottom value of the Size column is the uncompressed size of a request.

Click Use large request rows to enable large rows.

Hide the Overview pane

By default, DevTools shows the Overview pane. Click Hide overview to hide it.

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Sample Response Letters from the Courts and Agencies to Requests for Information. 1. Response to Initial Request for Information. 2. Response to Request for.

What should we do when we receive a request for information?

reply to request for information

When someone sends you a letter requesting information of some kind, it's important to respond promptly and briefly but without sounding curt. The key to a good letter answering request information or a reply letter to a request of documents is to sound as if you're happy to provide the information if you can or truly sorry if you cannot. Never sound as if they're bothering you with their request.

Start With a Personal Greeting

Letters requesting information of some kind are always signed by an individual, so be sure you start your letter with a personal reply to the letter writer. Computers make it easy to address the person by name even if you're using a template.

If the request letter was signed by Ms. Susan Kennedy, you should reply with "Dear Ms. Kennedy" followed by a comma or a colon. If the letter writer signed more informally, such as just "Susan Kennedy," it's always safe to use "Ms." However, if your business is known for being fun, hip or young, you may feel comfortable writing "Dear Susan" instead. When the name doesn't reveal the gender, use the first name: "Dear Alex" or "Dear Drew."

Open With Your Reason

Your first sentence should explain the reason for your letter. It may seem obvious that because the individual wrote to you first, he'll know why you're responding. However, stating this up front helps confirm that you're both talking about the same thing. When the inquiry was sent to someone else who forwarded it to you to reply, you need to also state that to avoid any confusion.

  • This letter is in response to your request for information about our cleaning products.

  • I'm writing in response to your request for information about our services.

  • Our VP of sales, Vicki Swenson, forwarded your recent letter to me since I handle requests for information.

If possible, follow this opening with a second sentence showing that you're pleased to be able to help.

  • I'm happy to help clear up the confusion.

  • I'm pleased to provide you with answers that can help you make your decision.

Provide the Requested Information

Start a new paragraph to provide the requested information as briefly as possible. If the information is lengthy or complicated, and you have a document that explains it well, state that you've included this document.

  • We have two products, sage and quartz, that I believe you will find quite useful. Sage is a (brief description), while quartz is more of a (brief description).

  • We have several products in this category, and I've enclosed brochures on each one that explain their features, benefits and best uses. 

Avoid impersonal phrases like "Enclosed please find..." Make your letter friendly and conversational by writing "I've enclosed..."

When You Can't Help

There may be times when you can't provide the information requested, whether you don't know the answer, the information is private or another reason. It's important to answer the letter regardless so your company still sounds responsive and caring.

  • Unfortunately, I can't answer your question at this time. Our ingredients are an old, carefully guarded family recipe.

  • I've searched our archives but have not been able to find answers to your questions. I'm truly sorry I couldn't help.

Thank Them for Writing

Thanking the letter writer for her letter is good business practice because it shows you know her time is valuable.

  • Thank you for taking the time to write.

  • Thanks for thinking of (company name) in your search for a security system.

Avoid sounding too much like a sales pitch, as in "Thanks for thinking of ABD. Remember, we make you secure at home, at work and at play."

Close By Offering More Help

Always end your response letter with an "our door is always open" feeling. Though you may be relieved to bring your letter to a close, you never want it to sound like a brush off.

  • If you need any more information, please contact me personally anytime.

  • If you have any questions about the document I enclosed, I'll be glad to answer them.

End simply with "Sincerely," skip four lines for your handwritten signature and then add your printed name and your title. Avoid trendy sign offs like "Best" or "Cheers" or the syrupy "Very truly yours."

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: How To Respond To A RFP (Request for Proposal)? What Should You Include In Your Proposal?
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Network Analysis Reference

reply to request for information

Responding to requests for information is a big part of a government department’s work. Types of requests include:

  • Freedom of Information (FoI) requests, which can come from anyone
  • Written parliamentary questions (PQs), from MPs or Peers
  • Ministerial correspondence, in reply to letters from parliamentarians.

Looking at the most recent data in all three fields – FoI for the year Q2 2015 to Q1 2016, written parliamentary questions for the most recent session (2015-16), and ministerial correspondence for 2015 – we can rank departments on which are most and least likely to respond on time across all three types.

DfT, DfID and DH are the most responsive departments and the Scotland Office the least…

The Department for Transport tops our responsiveness ranking, with the Department of International Development in second and Department of Health third.

At the bottom of the table is the Scotland Office, with the Ministry of Justice, Department for Culture, Media and Sport, and the erstwhile Departments of Energy and Climate Change and for Business, Innovation and Skills completing the bottom five.

…despite DfT and DH having a reasonably high volume of requests.

The performance of DfT and especially DH is particularly impressive given the volume of requests they receive: DfT is ranked 2nd, 9th, 5th and 6th in volume of PQs, ministerial correspondence, FoI requests and in total respectively, while DH ranks 1st, 3rd, 8th and 3rd.

DWP – which receives the second greatest volume of requests overall – is a respectable 8th in terms of overall timeliness, with the Home Office – which has the greatest volume, largely thanks to its ministerial correspondence – is 13th. Less respectable is the Scotland Office’s performance – this small department has one of the lowest volumes of requests.

Most departments are relatively consistent in their timeliness in answering the different types of correspondence: the top five departments score 90% or higher across all three types. The bottom four – Scotland Office, MoJ, DCMS and DECC – particularly struggle with ministerial correspondence.

Timeliness is only one measure of performance in responding to requests for information. It is more difficult to measure the quality of responses, although MySociety has published some research on parliamentary questions based on its TheyWorkForYou site and the House of Commons Procedure Committee received 21 complaints during the 2015-16 session. On FoI, we can also see which departments are withholding most information in response to requests – usually Cabinet Office, HMRC and MoJ – although there may be good (and legally exempted) reasons for doing so.

Nonetheless, timeliness is a good indicator of how well departments are performing in something which many ministers care about – Jo Swinson, for example, told us that she ‘had a rule that Parliamentary questions would never be late’ and Simon Hughes that ‘it’s really important that we give timely answers to colleagues both public ones and in correspondence’.

We’ll see next summer whether ministers in the low-performing departments decide to prioritise their answers to correspondence in this way – and also how the new departments for International Trade, Exiting the European Union and Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy fare.

Methodological note: In our analysis of ministerial correspondence data, we have applied our definition of departments and also consolidated some other categories, and therefore included some other bodies in the departmental total (HMCTS, NOMS and Office of the Public Guardian for MoJ; UK Visas & Immigration/Immigration Enforcement/Border Force for HO; and Child Maintenance Group, Human Resources and Director General for MoJ). The target response times bodies set themselves range from within 7 to 20 working days, and data is only published showing whether they answered within that target time, or not.

To come up with the overall ranking across PQs, ministerial correspondence and FoI, we added the individual ranks together and awarded the department with the lowest total first place, the second lowest total second place, etc, with the department with the highest total being awarded last place.

REPLY (Allow a Request to Continue Processing). Use this command and an QUERY REQUEST, Displays information about all pending mount requests.

IBM Tivoli Storage Manager for Linux: Administrator's Reference

reply to request for information

Rendezvous Reply to Request is a synchronous activity that is used to send a reply to a received TIBCO Rendezvous message.

General

The General tab has the following fields.

Field Literal Value/Process Property/Module Property? Description
Name None The name to be displayed as the label for the activity in the process.
Reply to None The TIBCO Rendezvous activity or process starter that received the request. This is a selection list of the following available activities that can receive TIBCO Rendezvous messages.
  • RendezvousSubscriber
  • WaitForRendezvousMessage
Reply Subject Yes The reply subject of the received TIBCO Rendezvous message. You can override this value by specifying a subject on the Input tab.
XML Compliant Field Names None Select this check box to specify whether the field names of the outgoing message should be altered so that they comply with the XML naming rules.

Clear this check box to alter only the field names that do not comply with XML naming rules. When selected, the field names are left unaltered.

Description

Provide a short description for the activity.

Input Editor

Use the Input Editor tab to define a custom schema for the body of the TIBCO Rendezvous message.

Conversations

You can initiate the conversation here. Click the Add New Conversation button to initiate multiple conversations.

Input

The following is the input for the activity.

Input Item Datatype Description
replySubject string The reply subject of the TIBCO Rendezvous message.

Fault

The Fault tab lists the possible exceptions thrown by this activity. See Error Codes for more information about error codes and the corrective action to take.

Fault Thrown When..
An error occurred when sending the reply message.

Copyright © TIBCO Software Inc. All Rights Reserved.

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: What Is A Request For Information?

REPLY (Allow a Request to Continue Processing). Use this command and an QUERY REQUEST, Displays information about all pending mount requests.

reply to request for information
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