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When to use yours truly

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When to use yours truly
May 02, 2019 Anniversary Wishes 4 comments

I know, when I'm writing "Dear Mr Sesambroetchen" that I'm using "Yours sincerely" and when I'm writing "Dear Sir or Madam" I'm writing.

The Quick Answer
Letters that start Dear Sir, should end Yours faithfully (UK convention) or Yours truly (US convention).

Letters that start Dear Mr. Jones, should end Yours sincerely (UK convention) or Sincerely yours (US convention).

"Yours sincerely" or "Yours faithfully"?

Writers are sometimes confused over whether to end a letter with Yours sincerely or Yours faithfully.

Even though there is a slight variation between British and American conventions, the rules are straightforward.

Use "Yours faithfully" () or "Yours truly" () for Unknown Recipients

If you do not know the name of the recipient (typically in business correspondence), use Yours faithfully if you're following UK convention and Yours truly if you're following US convention. (Letters that start with To whom it may concern fall into this category.)

Examples:
Dear Sir,

[blah, blah]

Yours faithfully,

Charles Windsor-Smyth
(Note: The use of Yours faithfully is growing increasingly popular in the US, but Yours truly is preferred.)
Dear Sir,

[blah, blah]

Yours truly,

Matt Brown

Use "Yours sincerely" () or "Sincerely yours" () for Known Recipients

If you know the name of the recipient (typically a colleague or close business associate), use Yours sincerely if you're following UK convention and Sincerely yours (or just Sincerely) if you're following US convention.

Examples:
Dear Mr. Jones,

[blah, blah]

Yours sincerely,

Charles Windsor-Smyth
Dear Mr. Jones,

[blah, blah]

Sincerely yours,

Matt Brown
(Note: The use of Sincerely (i.e., without Yours) is also acceptable in the US.)

With "Yours sincerely" and "Yours faithfully" Give Only the First Word a Capital Letter

Whatever you use, only capitalize the first word. For example:

Follow "Yours sincerely" and "Yours faithfully" with a Comma

Follow your postamble with a comma, and write your name underneath it.
Dear Sir,

[blah, blah]

Yours faithfully, (This comma is correct.)

Matt Brown

Write the Salutation, Postamble and Your Name by Hand

If you're sending a letter by post, it is a common practice (to add a personal touch) to write the salutation, postamble, and your name by hand. For example (hand-written text shown in yellow):

Dear Sir,

[blah, blah]

Yours faithfully,

Matt Brown

Yours truly/Yours meaning, definition, what is Yours truly/Yours: used to end a letter that begins with th: Learn more.

yours sincerely

when to use yours truly

yours truly

1. A phrase used as a complimentary close to a letter, similar to "sincerely." Yours truly, Jane

2. Me; I; myself. My boss claims credit for all these projects, but do you know who did all the work? Yours truly!Everybody is jumping on their bandwagon, but you can count out yours truly, because I'm loyal to my team.

See also: truly

yours truly

 

1. a closing phrase at the end of a letter, just before the signature. Yours truly, Tom Jones. Best wishes from yours truly, Bill Smith.

2. oneself; I; me. There's nobody here right now but yours truly. Everyone else got up and left the table leaving yours truly to pay the bill.

See also: truly

yours truly

1. A closing formula for a letter, as in It was signed "Yours truly, Mary Smith." [Late 1700s]

2. I, me, myself, as in Jane sends her love, as does yours truly. [Colloquial; mid-1800s]

See also: truly

yours ˈtruly


1 (informal, often humorous) I/me: Steve came first, Robin second, and yours truly came last. ♢ And of course, all the sandwiches will be made by yours truly.
2 (Yours Truly) (American English, formal, written) used at the end of a formal letter before you sign your name

See also: truly

yours truly

n. me, the speaker or writer. If it was up to yours truly, there wouldn’t be any such problem.

See also: truly

yours truly

I, myself, or me: "Let me talk about a typical day in the life of yours truly"(Robert A. Spivey).

See also: truly

yours truly

I, me, myself. This phrase has been used as a closing formula for letters since the late eighteenth century. By the mid-nineteenth century it was also being used as a synonym for “I,” as in George A. Sala’s The Baddington Peerage (1860): “The verdict will be ‘Guilty, my Lord,’ against yours truly.”

See also: truly

yours truly

I. For whatever reason of modesty (or false modesty) that prevented speakers or writers from using the first-person singular pronoun “I,” the “yours truly” convention was established. It came from the standard letter closing. It sounded mannered when it was first used in the 19th century and even more so now. Other equally stilted circumlocutions for “I” or “me” used in writing are “your reporter” (still found in alumni class notes) and “your correspondent.”

See also: truly

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when to use yours truly

  • 11-12-2004, 01:03 AM#1


  • 11-12-2004, 05:08 PM#2




    Good post? |

    Re: "Yours truly" Vs "Sincerely" ??

    Dingus,

    In UK (I don't know about US) there has been a long standing convention that:

    a) if you start a letter without using the addressee's name (eg Dear Madam) you finish it with Yours faithfully.

    b) if you start with their name (eg Dear Professor Smith) you end with Yours sincerely.

    I don't think there is much difference between Yours truly and Yours sincerely. Yours truly may be less formal.

    Personally I don't like Yours truly and I would never use it. I suspect that some people feel the same, so it may be safer to be sincere rather than true!

    I would never use Sincerely on its own.

    In business letters to people I know very well I might use Yours, Best wishes, Regards. If I did that I would always then only use my first name to sign, not my full name eg Regards, Michael).

    Wandering off-topic for a moment there is an idiomatic use of Yours truly = I/me, eg "People always expect yours truly to do the nasty jobs!"

    Michael
    Originally Posted by Dingus
    Hi Erin & Wasleys,

    Could you please help me on this one? Suppose I'm writing a letter to an admissions coordinator asking her a technical question about say, admission requirements, how would I end my letter?

    Like this:

    Yours truly,
    Dingus


    or


    Sincerely,
    Dingus


    If I'm writing to a professor and asking about research modalities, which closing phrase would I use? What is the difference between the two? Is one better than the other in different situations? Is there just a stylistic difference or does a difference in meaning exist too? Kind of confounded. Would really appreciate if you could shed some light on this.

    Sincerely (?)
    Dingus

    Last edited by wasleys; 11-12-2004 at 05:10 PM. Reason: HTML went haywire

  • 11-12-2004, 09:49 PM#3


  • 11-13-2004, 05:37 PM#4




    Good post? |

    Re: "Yours truly" Vs "Sincerely" ??

    Dingus,

    I was delighted to learn I have a fan club (even if the stalking bit has sinister undertones).

    The reason that I wouldn't use Yours truly or Sincerely is identical to my reason for not taking sugar in my tea. I don't like them!

    I really don't know if there is any great significance between truly and sincerely, I think truly is less widely used in UK.

    I wouldn't get hung up about it. I doubt that addressees really take any notice, although I would think it strange if a letter from my bank manager ended with Love.

    Really all we are talking about is a form of words to end a letter, so presumably grammar has nothing to do with it. Fashions change. I can remember business lettters ending with "Assuring you of our best attention at all times, we remain your obedient servant" (note the apparently ungrammatical we ... servant). The first part of that style remained in use until fairly recently. These days letters from some businesses have only a signature over a typed name.

    Re punctuation and parentheses.

    I was taught that if the bit in parenthesis was part of the sentence the stop went after (like this).

    If it was a sentence in its own right the stop went inside. (Here is an example.)

    Michael
    Originally Posted by Dingus
    Thanks Michael, for the very detailed explanation, as usual! Don't take it as some sort of stalking but I follow each and every one of your posts round the forum; they have a very nice quality of sticking easily in one's head, maybe because of the precise underlining of the key parts of the explanation.

    I'm very curious about one part of your explanation - you say that the UK usage of "yours truly" is less formal. I seem to have heard in one of my high-school classes that it is more formal than "yours sincerely". I wonder if this is the American usage of the phrase? The UK- American divide in spellings and usage is rather hard to get!

    One more thing is: why would you not use "sincerely" alone? I see it being used all the time. Is there a grammatical rule hidden in the usage (or non-usage)?

    An additional question about punctuation. If I have some extra information to be conveyed in a sentence and put in parenthesis, like this:

    It is a freshwater fish (also found in Papua New Guinea).

    Would I place the period after the parenthesis, before it or within?
  • 11-13-2004, 06:27 PM#5


  • 11-13-2004, 07:45 PM#6


  • 11-14-2004, 12:07 PM#7


  • 11-14-2004, 06:11 PM#8


  • 11-16-2004, 06:20 PM#9

    Eager!
    Rep Power
    15


    Good post? |

    Sincerely:

    Maybe, this helps shed some light on the sincerely question, it's the close of an email I've just received from Google, so sincerely does seem to be used on its own (followed by a line indicating the author):

    Thanks for being a part of Google AdSense.

    Sincerely,
    The Google AdSense Team


  • Yours truly/Yours meaning, definition, what is Yours truly/Yours: used to end a letter that begins with th: Learn more.

    Yours faithfully or Yours sincerely?

    when to use yours truly

    This is tricky, Emp.

    How can we judge what would be best in a different culture, particularly one where writing a letter to a teacher is regarded as offensive?

    In the UK, a letter starting Sir, tout court, is unusual. It's a form almost entirely reserved, in my experience, for letters to the editor of a newspaper.

    The simple formula which I was taught as a boy back in the middle ages was this:

    Personal letters to someone you don't know very well:

    Dear Mrs Podsnap or Dear Angela (for people you know a little better) - Yours sincerely

    Business letters:

    Dear Sir - Yours faithfully or Yours truly.

    Letters to close friends:

    Make your own rules but usually something likeDear Chicky - Lots of love, depending on how much heat you wish to generate.

    People starting letters Sir to newspapers often put Yours etc. at the end.

    These are the rules such as they were fifty years ago for our culture in the UK.

    If a student in your culture cannot write to a teacher without being disrespectful and offensive, as you seem to suggest, then take Loob's advice. I'm sure she will give you the best emollient formula.

     

    “Yours truly” would quite commonly be used in a complaint letter or a claim . In a formal letter, why do we write “yours faithfully”, and what is the term used for it?.

    when to use yours truly
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