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With best regard

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With best regard
August 22, 2019 Anniversary Wishes 2 comments

I don't know what type of letter that I should use ' regards ' or ' best regards ' to end it. Actually, what it really means is beyond me. Can anyone.

Some people swing the other way and end their emails with an altogether friendlier tone. While most would consider that kisses have no place in a business environment, they often creep into emails – and sometimes from people the recipient has never even met. For some, an "x" at the end of an email is a friendly endnote; for others it is totally inappropriate.

What’s clear is that some British terms used to end emails just do not translate well. A casual "cheers" is frequently used as a sign off on UK emails, but can be utterly perplexing for other nationalities. Not surprising when a hearty "cheers" also can be used for clinking glasses at the pub, or to thank a checkout person at the supermarket.

For Rosen, emails now occupy a halfway house between texts and letters.

"The key thing is that emails aren't the same as letters. I position them in my mind as a sort of halfway place between texts and hard copy letters: nearly formal but not totally formal, but they're not as informal as 'CU in a MNT on bus OMW'," says Rosen.

And, he adds given their place in this ambiguous no-man’s land of communication, it follows that there will continue to be a whole raft of ways to say "goodbye".

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Review the best way to end a letter, sample formal, business, and personal letter closings, sample signatures, and letter samples and writing tips. © The Balance.

Salutation/Best regards

with best regard

When ending an email or letter, before you write your name, you usually include a small signoff with something like "Best regards", "Kind regards", "Best wishes" or "Yours sincerely". But which of these signoffs should you use and when?

Best regards

"Best regards" is probably the most popular signoff for an email or letter. It can be used both formally in a professional or business setting, but it can also be used informally, say in birthday card or personal letter. If you are really unsure of which to include "Best regards" is probably the best and safest choice for you.

Kind regards

"Kind regards" is usually a little more formal than "Best regards". We would recommend to use "Kind regards" in a professional email or business letter where you feel comfortable with the person you are emailing or writing to, and it should not be used personal correspondence. Using another sentence before "Kind regards" can either make you sound less or more professional, as you are required to be, for example:

Formal Use of Kind regards

Please do not hesitate to contact me, should you have any further queries.
Kind regards,
Your Name

How many emails do you send a day?

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Less Formal Use of Kind regards

I look forward to talking to you more soon, enjoy your day!
Kind regards,
Your Name

Regards

Using just the words "Regards" would definitely be in a professional business email or letter. We also think that it doesn't necessarily invoke as much "kindness" or "lightheartedness", as "Kind regards". It may be used by someone that keeps their emails short and sweet and someone that doesn't have to go overboard with kindness. If you are using just "Regards", be careful that you don't come off to the person you are writing to, as not caring about the business or opportunity that you are writing about.

Warm regards

We have mixed feelings about using the words "Warm regards" in business emails or professional correspondence. If you know the customer or client personally that you are emailing, we think this is okay, but if you writing cold emails or emailing potential customers that have only inquired about your services and have not yet bought, stick to something more like "Kind regards" or "Best regards" until you get to know them more. Also, "Warm regards" may be more likely to be used in festive message or at a time when more "warmth" is required, for example:

Warm regards in a festive email or letter

Happy holidays to you and your family.
Warm regards,
Your Name

Warm regards, when more warmth is required

I'm sorry to hear about the loss of your grandma. My deepest condolences.
Warm regards,
Your Name

Yours sincerely

"Yours sincerely" is a very professional way to end a business email or letter, but if you're only a small business, we would advise with going with something a little less formal. Leave "Yours sincerely" for the corporate companies, and get a little more personal with your email by using "Kind regards" or "Best regards" instead. However, if you are writing to a corporate company about a potential job or internship, where they are likely to use "Yours sincerely" in a more formal setting, we would recommend using it too.

Yours faithfully

Do people even use "Yours faithfully" any more? We certainly haven't come across it in any business or personal correspondence in the last five to ten years. Our recommendation, go with something a little more modern and upbeat, or have a good reason to be writing the particular word "faithfully".

Yours faithfully - the only good reason to write it

I never cheated on you with your best friend.
Yours faithfully,
Your Name

#kidding

All the best

We actually really like this one. It can be used in professional or informal writing. It invokes a sense of kindness that you are wishing them all the best, but it's shorter than saying "I wish you all the best". Use this if you don't need to be overly formal and are ok with more of a relaxed tone with the person you are emailing.

Results from our Poll - Which Sign Off do you use?

Since 2014, over 8,000 people have taken our poll! We asked the question, what signoff do you use? Here's the results.

1. Kind regards (1,620 votes)
2. Best regards (1,366 votes)
3. Regards (699 votes)
4. Other (351 votes)
5. All the best (332 votes)
6. Yours sincerely (189 votes)
7. Warm regards (156 votes)
8. No signoff (67 votes)
9. Yours faithfully (55 votes)

The people that voted in our poll came from all over the globe.


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The best and worst ways to sign off a work email

with best regard

en Newton Blade sends his best regards

opensubtitles2
sr Trebali smo da znamo!

en Give Geneviève my best regards, and I shall not fail to visit you

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Ko je taj Barney?

en Best regards! Mail handwriting.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr To je surovo

en Duplessis sends you his best regards.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Irene, vrti mi se u glavi

en Full many a lady I have eyed with best regard and many a time the harmony of their tongues hath into bondage brought my too diligent ear

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Sad sam ih našao

en Best regards, etc.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Moja kraljica je pravedna

en Please give her my best regards.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Ti si detektiv

en Please send the best regards of the U.S. president to the royal sultan.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Recite nam vaše ime i zanimanje

en Best regards from George and Gilda.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Prestanite se brinuti za mene

en Newton Blade sends his best regards.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Pikanterija

en Give my best regards...... to Mrs. Barnier

opensubtitles2
sr Danju psihijatar a noću zver

en Uh, he sends his best regards to you

opensubtitles2
sr Prošle nedelje, našli su ženu kod kuće, vezali je i opljačkali stan

en Phyllis sends her best regards.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Posebno je opasan za zdravlje, gospodine...... Bond

en Feri Ats sent his best regards and told us to say that you should get better!

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr U redu. Nadam se da si u pravu

en Send him my best regards.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Iz svih zemalja

en Best regards and kisses.I remain... your sister

opensubtitles2
sr Neka se još jednom poljube!

en Give Mrs. Bolwieser my best regards.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Njen duh jeizabrao da se tebi obrati

en Miss Desiree gives her best regards and says you shouldn't be sorry.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Colin, zašto ti se sviđam?

en Eh, he sends his best regards to you

opensubtitles2
sr Samo spusti prokleti pištolj pre nego što me ubiješ, Alis

en 'Oh, by the way, your girlfriend sends her best regards.'

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Posle # godina rada u pustinji kao ja, čuješ dosta stvari, i vidiš dosta stvari

en Best regards.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Ne znam ni kako se zove

en Best regards Fredrik Nilsson, head doctor.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Ti donosiš nevolje!

en Best regards, Louis Drax. "

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Zafrkavao se!

en But please give her my best regards

opensubtitles2
sr Žao mi je zbog problema

en Best regards for Carola.

OpenSubtitles2018.v3
sr Ja i niko drugi?

The closing: "Kind regards" Bates: This is a great all-purpose business salutation. It may be best for people you have corresponded with in the.

Regards, Best Regards, Kind Regards—How to Use Them in an Email

with best regard

Find out what business etiquette experts have to say about the expressions we use to end work-related emails.

6 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

You've just finished composing an email to a potential client you've talked with a few times before. Now for the tricky part: your sign-off. Should you use "Sincerely," "Kind regards" or "Cheers"? How do you sound friendly without coming across as unprofessional? And then there are the emails to your employees, business contacts and friendly acquaintances.

Unfortunately, there's no "email bible" to guide you. That's why we contacted two business communication experts to discuss what's appropriate. Suzanne Bates, president and CEO of Bates Communications, Inc. and author of Speak Like a CEO: Secrets For Commanding Attention and Getting Results, and Cherie Kerr, founder of ExecuProv and author of The Bliss or "Diss" Connection? Email Etiquette For The Business Professional, pair up to give expert insight into the world of e-mail correspondence.

Related: Need a Business Idea? Here are 55

Read on to find out what message your favorite e-mail goodbye is actually sending.

The closing: "Thanks"
Bates: It's OK if you're actually thanking people. But keep in mind it's casual; you should know them if you're using this sign-off.
Kerr: This is one of the safest and most courteous of the salutations. It keeps it pleasant, but professional.

The closing: "Ciao"
Bates: This isn't for business, except for fashion, art or real Italians.
Kerr: "Ciao" should only be used for close buddies or work pals. It's not appropriate for business purposes.

The closing: "Sincerely"
Bates: Tried and true for a formal business close, and you'll never offend anyone.
Kerr: A bit too formal for e-mail. This salutation can put people off. People really expect this in a letter, not an e-mail.

The closing: "Kind regards"
Bates: This is a great all-purpose business salutation. It may be best for people you have corresponded with in the past.
Kerr: This is one I use quite often. I like some kind of warmth, but also keep it business-like. I tend to use "Kindest regards."

Related: 100 Businesses You Can Start With Less Than $100

The closing: "Regards"
Bates: It's less friendly than "Kind regards," and can be a bit perfunctory, but it generally works well.
Kerr: This salutation is a little short and a little distant, but at least it's a closing message.

The closing: "Best"
Bates: "Best" is colloquial, but fine for someone you know. "Best wishes" or "Best regards" would be better for business.
Kerr: This is another acceptable sign-off, especially if you're using it with someone you know really well.

The closing: "Cheers"
Bates: Only use this sign-off for friends and business colleagues you might meet for coffee.
Kerr: You can use this with someone you know well, but if you're trying to make a business impression, this is not a great way to say goodbye when you're first doing business with someone. Save it for after having established a bond.

The closing: "TGIF"
Bates: Never use this salutation for your boss.
Kerr: Use it for a good work buddy at clock-out time on Friday.

The closing: "Talk soon"
Bates: Very nice for a friend, but you better mean it.
Kerr: It's a nice way to sign-off. It lets the other person know there will be phone or face time soon, and that's important and appreciated in this wacky age of e-mail. People need to talk more.

The closing: "Later"
Bates: Not appropriate for business correspondence; it sounds like you're 14 years old.
Kerr: Only use this salutation in friendly business relationships.

The closing: "Cordially"
Bates: It's a little old-fashioned, but not offensive.
Kerr: This is safe and pleasant and gives people a "feel good" close at the end of your e-mail.

The closing: "Yours truly"
Bates: Excellent for formal business.
Kerr: Too formal for e-mail.

The closing: No closing at all -- just an electronic signature
Bates: There is a school of thought that an email is not a letter; I don't subscribe to that. I think most people come to the end of a note and expect a closing. It could come across as abrupt without one. It may also subtly say, "I'm in a hurry," "I don't know how to sign- off," or "I'm not someone who cares about niceties."
Kerr: Always use a salutation, but don't be redundant. Change it up. That makes people think you care by taking the time to "converse" with them by email.

Related: 50 Jobs, Gigs and Side Hustles You Can Do From Home

Aside from closings, Bates and Kerr pointed out a few other email faux pas:

  • Avoid writing in caps. Bates says people will be so perplexed as to why the email is in all caps that they won't be focusing on what you have to say. Kerr agrees, pointing out that writing in bold or caps comes across in an email as yelling. "Even saying 'Have a good day' in all caps might sound sarcastic," says Kerr.
  • Don't use emoticons. Smiley faces and different expressions can be fun to use, but according to both experts, they're not appropriate for business correspondence. "They're not professional, however, they're quite common. My advice is, for business, leave them out," advises Bates. Kerr suggests trying to use appropriate words to convey the feelings you're trying to express.
  • Think before you write. Profanity is definitely an email no-no. Kerr says profanity hits harder on the computer screen than when you might say it in passing. She also recommends limiting use of the word "really" or other intensifiers. According to Bates, a good rule of thumb is, "Avoid using any word you wouldn't want to see on the front page of The New York Times with your signature next to it."
  • Consider the context of the e-mail and the receiver when using trendy words. A popular sign-off entering plenty of inboxes right now is "Cheers." Bates suggests thinking about the email text and the receiver before using a word like that. Stay current with your word choice so you don't appear behind the times. Kerr's favorite trendy salutation of late: "Muchly," sent to her by a friend.

Ist "with best regards" im englischen Sprachraum gebräuchlich oder eher eine wörtliche Übersetzung unseres "mit freundlichen Grüßen".

with best regard
Written by JoJojas
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