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Decline your offer quotes

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Decline your offer quotes
August 03, 2019 Wedding Anniversary Wishes 4 comments

every so often someone else does the job we quote for, just put it down to . got a price of x (which may be a little less than actual), and see if he offers to beat it.

When you try to help someone—or, for that matter, give them something—it can feel like a personal affront when they turn you down. In their rejecting your offer, you can hardly help but feel somewhat rejected yourself. So it’s useful to explore what, beneath the surface, might be motivating them to decline your sincere efforts at assistance. Especially since their negative response may surprise or confuse you, or even seem pigheaded or perverse.

To better grasp the apparent irrationality of another’s unwillingness to take what you’re perfectly happy to give them, here are four questions to ask yourself (and maybe ask them as well):

(1) Might they be too proud to accept your offer? As a matter of personal pride, they might feel that to take what you’re offering them would be to admit inferiority, inadequacy, dependency, or defeat. And such a reaction could be the case whether you’re proposing a financial gift or loan, or concrete assistance with something they’re struggling with. Any money offered them, even if only temporarily, could make them feel patronized—or as though they were some sort of “charity case,” pitiful enough to be offered a hand-out. Additionally, accepting non-monetary help on a task or project might be experienced by them as conceding an inability to successfully complete the work on their own.

(2) Might they feel too undeserving to accept your offer? Did they possibly grow up regularly receiving the message from their caretakers that they were entitled to nothing? And that asking for things was unacceptably selfish—a behavior they needed to repudiate? If so, they might feel they have no right to accept what you’re more than happy to offer them. That they haven’t sufficiently earned your proposed gift or assistance.

Since in the end it’s emotions that govern behavior, it’s safe to assume that if these individuals did allow themselves to take what you were freely offering, they’d feel guilty. For that would be the emotion most closely linked to violating a family rule that, earlier, they swallowed whole. They might even feel anxious that if they “dared” accept your generosity, they’d be punished (i.e., by the highly judgmental parental voices still echoing inside their head). For it may be that they were rebuked anytime they accepted something not explicitly authorized by their parents.

(3) Might they connect acceptance with incurring a burdensome sense of obligation? They may not wish to be beholden to anybody for anything. For they view all external help as carrying a heavy price tag, as implicitly demanding reciprocity later on that would seriously disadvantage them. So your offer may threaten their sense of freedom, independence, security, or autonomy. In such instances, they’re compelled, from deep within, to reject whatever you—or, for that matter, anybody else—might wish to offer them.

If in the past strings almost always seemed to be attached to whatever they received, they may have decided (whether consciously or not) that it was in their best interest never to accept favors from others. People who seem excessively independent may have learned to be that way because their experience validated the notion that taking anything from anybody was simply too risky. So, quite understandably, they concluded that it was better—or safer—to turn down proposed presents, or assistance, than be indebted to whomever might “gift” them.

(4) Might they associate taking from others as rendering themselves more vulnerable to them? This final explanation is an overarching one. And in a sense the first three explanations could all be viewed, indirectly, as necessitating a greater willingness to experience personal vulnerability. But here I’m focusing specifically on the individual’s fear of accepting something because of abiding trust issues. They may fear that taking—as opposed to giving—will place them one down in the relationship, and that such subordinate “positioning” will lessen their ability, going forward, to protect themselves.

If in the past such “taking” was, unexpectedly, used against them, then why in the world would they open themselves up to the possibility of re-experiencing such betrayal? Victimized precisely because in the past someone convinced them that it was okay to accept some sort of unearned “perk,” they learned—or more likely, overlearned—the sad lesson of distrust. If the gift received was in reality an instrument of manipulation later used to exploit them, then now anything like a gratuitous offer can rouse their suspicions, strongly prompting a knee-jerk refusal.

An extreme example of this “learned distrust” might be an individual who was molested as a child—by a person who “groomed” them for such molestation through carefully contrived favors and gift-giving. Made to feel super-special, valued, and loved by the pedophile, at some point they felt compelled to acquiesce to the increasingly intimate physical advances made upon them. Such early trauma can lead to lasting distrust of anyone professing concern for them—anyone offering to give them something or help them with something.

So, consider: the next time a person you’d sincerely like to assist (either with time, energy, or money) pretty much dismisses your offer out of hand, then—rather than take it personally—think about what, frankly, might be making it impossible for them to be the willing recipient of your largesse.

NOTE: If you found this piece in any way illuminating, please pass it on. Additionally, if you'd like to check out other posts I've done for Psychology Today—on a broad variety of topics—click here.

© 2012 Leon F. Seltzer, Ph.D. All Rights Reserved.

----- I invite readers to join me on Facebook—as well as to follow my varied theoretical musings on Twitter.

If you want to quote professionally, this blog post outlines all the keys items to If you decline, your information won't be tracked when you visit this website. Your quote needs to be well-written in order to demonstrate your.

Collecting quotes- do you/how do you turn down the other companies?

decline your offer quotes

The Streamtime Client facing interface allows your Clients to accept and decline their Quotes, and submit comments online. As an Account Manager, you'll get a notification and can take action to begin the job or start ordering that print work! Clients will also be able to see all Active Jobs for their Company when they log in.

Please note that you will need to ensure you've got access to Streamtime Web first. Please contact our Support team to arrange this, or if you've got sufficient IT skills please follow the instruction here.

Step 1. Setting up your clients so they can sign in online

Once you have created a company in Streamtime you'll then need to add each of the contacts at that company under the People tab (1).

When you create a person in Streamtime you'll need to make sure they have an email address (1) and a password (2) assigned to them, this will be how they sign into their web interface to view their quotes and jobs.

Once you have done the setup you can then send your clients the URL they'll need to access their web interface, as well as their username (email address) and password. The URL is usually https://yourcompanyname.mystreamtime.com/clients

If you're working online you can send your new Client an invitation to set up their own password online. Please note that it is possible to revoke this access once it has been set up.

Step 2. Setting Up default Approved/Declined Quote Statuses for Streamtime Web

More information on Streamtime statuses here.

Visit Setup > System Setup > Quotes area, scroll down to the heading Defaults, here you can set what statuses your quotes change to once your client approves or declines your quote using the Client facing interface.

Viewing Quotes in the Client facing interface

When your clients sign into the Client Web interface they can see only quotes with specific statuses, as defined in the System Setup:

  1. Quotes on the "To Be Approved" status are always visible to your client.
  2. Quotes on the "Approved" status are showing only when they are also 'active'. So if a client approves a quote today, it's likely he can still see that approved quote tomorrow. Later – when the job is finished – we will lock the job and automatically lock and deactivate the related quotes, making them disappear from the web too.
  3. Quotes on the "Declined" status are showing only when they are also 'active'. This will be rather exceptional. But if you are making a revised version of a quote that was formerly declined, you could still give your client access to the declined quote for comparison, just by making it active.

Quote Detail in Client Web Interface

When they view the quote they will see all the quote details and can choose to Accept or Decline the quote.

Accepting Quotes

To accept the quote they simply need to click the Accept button.

This will change the status of the quote in Streamtime Web,

and also change the Quote status in your Streamtime database.

The status will be changed to whatever you set it to default to in Setup > System Setup > Quotes (as above).

Declining Quotes

To decline the quote they simply need to click the Decline button. There's also the option to add notes.

This will remove the quote from the quotes list inside the web portal,

and also change the Quote status in your Streamtime database.

The status will be changed to whatever you set it to default to in Setup > System Setup > Quotes (as above).

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decline your offer quotes

Depending on the workflow your company uses, they may require the skills and a can-do-attitude from an Authoriser to decide the fate of their traveller(s). 

As an assigned Authoriser within the Locomote Corporate Travel Platform, it is your role and responsibility to review and approve or decline quotes, submitted by Travellers, Travel Arrangers and/or Travel Consultants. 

If you are unable to Authorise the trip as you'll be away, you can delegate your duties to another Authoriser by following this article. Otherwise the Traveller can forward authorise onto another authoriser.

Authorise a Quote

  1. From the Dashboard open the relevant trip in the AwaitingAuthorisation tab that should have a Quote Issuedstate
  2. By default the Quotes page will appear; Review the trip details and any quote(s) listed at the bottom of the page
  3. To view the quote, click View to the right-hand side of the quote name
  4. To discuss with the Traveller, Travel Arranger or Travel Consultant, you can send a message to any parties involved to get further information, prior to authorising the quote by clicking Discuss
  5. If you need to defer to another Authorsier, click Forward Authorisation 
  6. Otherwise if all is good, authorise the preferred quote by clicking Authorise to the right of the quote(s)
  7. The parties involved (ie. Traveller, Travel Arranger) will be receive an email, notifying them what has occurred and the next steps in the process.

Decline a Quote

  1. From the Dashboard open the relevant trip in the AwaitingAuthorisation tab that should have a Quote Issuedstate
  2. By default the Quotes page will appear; Review the trip details and any quote(s) listed at the bottom of the page
  3. To view the quote, click View to the right-hand side of the quote name
  4. To discuss with the Traveller, Travel Arranger or Travel Consultant, you can send a message to any parties involved to get further information prior to declining the quote by clicking Discuss (this is recommended, as the Travel Arranger/Consultant can edit the quote)
  5. If you need to defer to another Authorsier, click Forward Authorisation 
  6. Otherwise if you do not approve of the (preferred) quote, click Decline All Quotes
  7. The parties involved (ie. Traveller, Travel Arranger) will be receive an email, notifying them what has occurred and the next steps in the process.

Note

The state of the itinerary will be Itinerary Declined, however the shell of the trip request will remain be open. For the Traveller, there are a few of options after the quote has been declined.

  • Submit a new quote via Continue Booking
  • Cancel the Trip altogether via clicking Cancel Trip
  • Click Discuss and find out why the quote was declined.

Once you have decided to quit and have a confirmed offer in hand, there is no point in going off on a rant, says Kamat. Reject the Offer Politely.

How do I Decline to Submit a Quote?

decline your offer quotes

5 ways to handle counter-offers

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5 ways to handle counter-offers

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Evaluate Your Decision

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Reject the Offer Politely

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By providing us with the details to decline me and another offer me.

decline your offer quotes
Written by Tojanos
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