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Official introduction letter sample

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Official introduction letter sample
December 28, 2018 Wedding Anniversary Wishes 3 comments

Here's a sample letter of introduction to help you brainstorm your own. Judy is looking A letter of introduction is a formal way for you, or your.

This page will teach you the how to properly format a business letter, as well as provide a wealth of examples, templates, and writing guides to help you write yours.

Table of Contents

  1. Business Letter Examples
  2. Sample Business Letter Template
  3. Business Letter Format & Writing Guide

1. Business Letter Examples: Common & Career-Specific Types

We’ve provided extensive how-to guides for writing the following common examples of business letters. Just click the images below to download our free letter templates.

2. Sample Business Letter Template

The business world is filled with intricate behavior guidelines and overly formal communication styles. A business letter allows multiple parties to exchange relevant information professionally. It can also be more impactful to a reader than an email, due its formalized structure, content, and tone.

Our general business letter template can be used for any kind of professional communication/correspondence, including cover letters and letters of interest. Simply decide if you want a letterhead, click the download button, and let our template guide you through the writing process.

Business Letter Template: Click to Read in Text Format

Business Letter Format – Without Letterhead (Text Format)

[1234 Street Address]

[City, State, Zip]

[Email Address]

 

[Today’s Date]

 

[Addressee Name]

[Addressee Title]

[Company Name]

[1234 Street Address]

[City, State, Zip]

 

Dear [Name],

In this paragraph, deliver a friendly and clear introduction. State the main point of the letter here. Keep this section short and to the point.

In this paragraph, explain the importance of the main point by providing compelling and persuasive reasoning.

In this paragraph, continue to provide background information to back up your reasons. You can use facts, data, and other quantifiable metrics to support your claim.

Close by restating the main point of the letter, and if you can, include a call to action.

Respectfully/Sincerely,

 

 

[Your Signature]

[Your Name]

3. Formal Business Letter Format & Writing Guide

When it comes to how to format a letter, you need to pay attention to the format of both the page and the content. Both are essential for creating the professional look that is the foundation of any proper business letter.

Page Format – 5 Key Rules

Before you begin writing, decide which layout you want to use. There are two common formatting styles: block and modified block. The block format has a left-aligned address and closing, while those in the modified block are right-aligned. While the block format is used more often, both are acceptable for a formal letter.

The following are the standard rules that should be adhered to when formatting the page of a formal letter:

1. Alignment:

All proper business letters should be left-aligned, any other type of alignment is considered unacceptable in most professional settings.

2. Spacing:

Your letter should be single-spaced. In addition, there should be a space between the date, address, salutation, and each paragraph. Include four line breaks between the closing and your printed name to leave space for your signature.

3. Font:

The standard font style is Times New Roman, size 12. However, you can use other sans-serif fonts such as Helvetica, Arial, Courier, or Geneva, also at size 12. Sans-serif fonts have been credited with increased readability because of their balanced typeface.

4. Lines:

When using a letterhead, be sure to add a horizontal line underneath it. You can refer to our letters above to see some examples.

5. Margins:

Keep your margins between 1 to 1.5 inches. Generally speaking, 1-inch margins are the most widely accepted format for professionals.

If you want to be taken seriously, make sure all of your punctuation is used correctly.

Content Format & How To Write a Business Letter

The following tips cover all the parts of a business letter in order from top to bottom.

Part 1 (a). Letterhead – Formal Letter Format

Most professional business letters include a letterhead – which is comprised of your name, address, phone number, and email address. 

Letterheads are meant to make your letter unique, as well as help verify its authenticity to the recipient. Likewise, you can include your company’s logo on the letterhead for brand recognition and a more trustworthy appearance.

Check out the example letterheads below — both of which are acceptable methods for displaying your name and contact information. For more ideas, you can check out ourcover letter templates. See the letterhead sample:

Part 1 (b). No Letterhead – Formal Letter Format

Using a letterhead is always preferable when writing a business letter. However, if you decide to not use one, you must use the following format to maintain a professional appearance:

  • Write your contact information on the top left of the page, just above the date.
  • Do NOT include your name in this section — when selecting this style, it simply looks better to sign off with your name at the end of the letter.
  • Only include your street address, city, state, and zip code.
  • Double check our business letter sample to make sure yours is perfect.

Example of format when not using a letterhead:

Part 2. Date

The date should be the day on which you completed the letter, written in standard U.S. format (eg. October 28, 2017). It should be written underneath the letterhead, or underneath the address on the top left of the page.

Part 3. Addressee – How to Address a Letter in 4 Steps

Write the recipient’s (or “addressee’s”) address on the top left side underneath the date. Begin with the name of the addressee on the first line. Some research may be necessary to find the name (LinkedIn, the company’s website, even Google search are all great tools).

  • Step 1: Address them properly as Ms., Mrs., or Mr. Also, make sure to include their title — such as Dr. — if it applies.
  • Step 2: Beneath their name, write their current title. If you are unsure what their title is, do the necessary research to find out if possible. If they have no title, leave it blank.
  • Step 3: Include the name of their company underneath their title.
  • Step 4: Write out their company’s street address, city, state, and zip code. If they are located outside the United States, include the country name after the city.

Even if you’re sending your letter as an email attachment, you should still include the address to maintain a professional appearance.

Part 4. Salutation

The salutation you will use depends on the title of your addressee, your familiarity with them, and also the context of the letter.

If you are familiar with the addressee, then use their first name (unless they have specifically asked you otherwise).

  • If the addressee has earned a Ph.D. or an MD, then refer to them as Dr. (or Professor).
  • Military titles such as General, Colonel, Major, etc., should be honored as such.
  • If you do not know the contact person or you are addressing a group, use an appropriate salutation such as Sir or Madam, Hiring Manager, Director of Human Resources, Members of the [Name] Committee (hiring committee, organizing committee, acceptance committee), Board of Directors.

When it comes to salutations, it is always better to err on the side of caution and be polite as possible.

Part 5. Body

The body of the letter is located underneath the salutation, and is the field where you get down to business and discuss the reason you’re reaching out to this person. Usually, the body includes several strategic paragraphs meant to inform, persuade, and convey gratitude.

  1. In the first paragraph, get to your point quickly and state it concisely in the first line. Do not wait until the second paragraph to tell your audience what your main point is – they most likely won’t get that far.
  2. In the second paragraph, use evidence and persuasive reasoning to justify your main point. If needed, use an extra paragraph to further support your point via empirical evidence.
  3. The closing paragraph should restate the point of the letter, and most importantly, include a call to action. A call to action is a passage that compels your reader to do something. Ask yourself, “what do I want my reader to do right after reading this letter?

Examples of calls to action:

  • Please call me at [phone #] or email me at [email address] at your earliest convenience.”
  • Please get in touch with me at your earliest convenience to schedule a meeting.”
  • Please let me know how I may be of assistance during this period.”

Part 6. Closing

You should always close with a positive sign-off, such as “Thank you,” “Sincerely,” or “Respectfully.” Remember to only capitalize the first word of this closing  line, and to leave four lines of space between the closing line and your typed name to make room for your signature.

Part 7. Enclosure

An enclosure note is an often neglected aspect of letter writing in the digital era. In fact, not many people actually know what ‘enclosure’ means. When you write “enclosure” in any letter you’re implying that another document is attached to the file.

Think of it as something akin to a “see attachment” note in an email. It alerts the reader to another part of your correspondence – and helps prevent them from overlooking a crucial document.

The image below shows where the word “enclosure” should be placed:

6. Conclusion

Knowing how to write a business letter is a fundamental skill for your professional life. A proper one will have most or all of the elements mentioned above. Be sure to carefully review the grammar, spelling, and format of your business letter numerous times before you send it out, to avoid leaving a poor first impression with your correspondent.

Looking for some more ideas on how to write a letter? Our experts have written of guides on how to write various types of formal letters. Check out our comprehensive letter of recommendation sample libraryfor more inspiration!

Written by the Resume Genius Team

The Resume Genius Team is made up of a tight-knit crew of dedicated career coaches, hiring managers, and staff writers who are passionate about providing the best, most up-to-date career advice possible and helping job... more

If you want to get a job at your dream company, but currently there is no right open vacancy, then use this letter of interest examples to get your.

How to Write the First Paragraph of Your Cover Letter

official introduction letter sample

Here is a company introduction letter sample from our library of email templates. And just below the sample letter are few key concepts that we take into consideration when we create a company introduction letter sample.

Subject line: It takes longer than needed to place a new hire

Hello [Prospect First Name],

The reason I am reaching out is that I am with [company name] and we find that it is very common for hiring managers to have challenges with:

  • It can take longer than needed to place a new hire
  • They are of not presented with the right candidates
  • It is difficult to find time for the interview process because of their everyday responsibilities

I am not sure if you are concerned about any of those and that is why I am reaching out to you and I will try to give you a call next week.

If you are interested in talking before then, I can schedule a brief 15 to 20 minute meeting next Tuesday or Thursday morning where we can discuss your goals and challenges and share any value and insight that we have to offer.

Best Regards,

 

Don’t Sound Like a Salesperson
One of the key concepts we think is important for introduction letters is to try to not sound like a salesperson trying to sell something. If that is in fact what you are, it is OK but you can have a better letter if you try to sound more like a business person than a salesperson.

Don’t Focus Too Much on Products and Company Details
One way to not sound like a salesperson is to resist the urge to share a bunch of details about your products and company in your company introduction letter sample.

Share Details About How You Help
You may think that if you don’t talk about your company and products, what are you going to have left to say. What you can talk about instead is sharing details around the improvements that you can help the prospect to see, problems you can help to resolve, or share an example of how you have helped one of your current or past customers.

Sell the Meeting, Not the Product
Be sure to design your introduction letter so that you are selling the meeting or conversation instead of trying to sell the product.

The Company Introduction Letter Sample
In the sample letter below, we have taken those concepts into consideration and have a letter or email that can be sent to a cold prospect to try to establish the dialogue. This particular letter is one of our templates that is for a campaign that is selling recruiting services and this message is designed to focus on the pain points that the service helps to resolve.

We hope this company introduction letter sample helps you to take your game to the next level.

Google

Michael Halper, Founder and CEO of SalesScripter and author of “The Cold Calling Equation – PROBLEM SOLVED", is an expert on how to penetrate new accounts, get meetings with executives, and generate leads. His mastery of this area began while working in hunting roles selling technology products to large corporations and took it to the next level while building and managing an inside sales call center.

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Letter of Interest Examples and Format [+Introduction Letters, and Inquiry Letter Samples]

official introduction letter sample

A letter of introduction is a type of correspondence, usually email, used to introduce one person to a friend or professional colleague to another person or group of people. During your career, you might need to write a letter of introduction for a variety of reasons, including the following:

  • Introducing one colleague to another
  • Introducing clients or customers
  • Introducing new team members
  • Introducing a contractor or freelancer
  • Introducing a job candidate

A professional, clearly communicated letter of introduction can help give people the context and information they need when meeting someone new. Writing this type of letter can help move projects forward, onboard a team member, connect someone to gain new skills and more. In this guide, we’ll provide instructions for how to write a quality letter of introduction that can be helpful for you, clients and colleagues alike.
 

Create a Resume on Indeed

 

How to write an introduction letter

While you can write a letter of introduction for several different situations, there are a few common elements you should include. When writing your letter, be sure to tailor it to the introduction you’re making by including information that will be helpful for both parties.

You should include the following pieces of information in a letter of introduction:

  1. Write a greeting
  2. Include a sentence on why you’re writing
  3. Present the full name of the person you’re introducing
  4. Explain their role and how it is relevant to the reader
  5. Provide information on how they might work together or be helpful for each other
  6. Include any necessary contact information
  7. Close with any next steps or other necessary details
  8. Sign off with your name and title

Let’s take a closer look at how you can construct a professional letter of introduction by using each of the above elements.

 

Elements of a letter of introduction

When writing a letter of introduction, remember to use clear, understandable language. Many people have only a short time to read through email correspondences, so be as brief as possible without leaving out any key information.

 

1. Write a greeting

To start, write a short greeting that opens the letter in a thoughtful way. Here, you will include their name on the first line, followed by a friendly start. For example:

    “Hi Linda,

    Hope you had a lovely weekend!”

 

2. Include a sentence on why you’re writing

Next, explain your purpose for emailing them. Provide any necessary context that will help the reader understand why you are making an introduction and why it involves them.

    “I’m writing as a follow-up from our meeting about defining better processes for billing and reporting inquiries for our physical therapy patients.”

 

3. Present the full name of the person you’re introducing

Be sure to include their first and last name and any important titles that might help the reader.

    “I’d like to introduce you to Alberto Ruiz.”

 

4. Explain their role and how it is relevant to the reader

Writing a short summary explaining position and function of the person you’re introducing. Include their title, then a brief overview of what they do and how they have been successful as it relates to the reader.

    “Alberto is the HR representative that supports all therapy departments for our branch. He has been instrumental in developing streamlined processes for other teams that have reduced payment time by 20%.”

 

5. Provide information on how they might work together or be helpful for each other

Next, briefly explain how and why you are making the introduction. For example, they might be working closely in the future or could find the other’s expertise helpful in their own work.

    “I’ve spoken with Alberto in depth about our project. He explained that he has extra time this quarter to help us brainstorm ideas to better our administrative processes. He is willing and ready to meet with us at the beginning of next week.”

 

6. Include any necessary contact information

If you are emailing, it is a good idea to include the email of the person you’re introducing in the “CC” line so your audience can reference it. If you feel there is additional contact information that is necessary, you should include it here as well.

    “Feel free to reach out to Alberto via email (he is cc’d here), or on his work phone at (333) 222-4444. He is expecting to hear from you.”

 

7. Close with any next steps or other necessary details

Conclude your introduction letter with any actions that need to be taken by you, the reader or the person you’re introducing. Make sure you are clear by referencing the person you’re speaking to by name.

    “I’ll go ahead and set up our meeting to get started next week. Thanks for your teamwork on this project! Thank you in advance, Alberto, for your help.”

 

8. Sign off with your name and title

End your email with a professional sign-off like “Thanks,” or “Sincerely.” Then, include your full name, title and contact information as needed.

    “All the best,

    Henry Thomas
    Accounts Payable Coordinator”

 

Letter of introduction example

Here’s another example of a letter of introduction for you to use as inspiration as you craft your own:

Hello Cecilia,

I hope the week has been good for you! I’m writing to introduce you to our new project manager, Patricia Jefferson. Patricia comes to us with several years of project management experience, specifically in managing large, long-term construction projects for multifamily residences. Her background will be extremely helpful for our team as we launch our plans for next year.

While you will not be working with Patricia on a daily basis, she will be able to provide you with regular timeline updates as you present our progress in the quarterly company meetings. You can find her email at the top of this note, feel free to reach out directly as needed.

We’re excited about having Patricia on board, and I look forward to your new working relationship. Please let me know if you need any additional information moving forward.

Thanks for your time,

Gertrude Petty

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The letter of introduction, along with the visiting card, was an important part of polite social interaction in the 18th and 19th centuries. It remains important in formal situations, such as an ambassador presenting For example, it was best practice to deliver a letter of introduction to the intended recipient with a visiting card.

Introduction Letter Samples

official introduction letter sample

For anyone applying for a visa, one of the documents that may be required as part of the application documents is an introduction letter. More often than not, a visa applicant who is an employee of a company will need his employer to prepare an introduction letter for him/her. This type of introduction letter is also referred to as the No Objection Certificate.

After publishing my last article about the faultless cover letter for Schengen visa application where I gave insights into the relevant contents and presented a sample draft of such a good cover letter, many people have asked me about how to write a good introduction letter for visa applications. In this post, I have put together the basic requirements of a good introduction letter for an employee. Since the content of such an introduction letter is usually the same for a visa application to most countries, this piece and the sample draft below, I hope, will serve as a general purpose material for any employer issuing a NOC to an employee.

Contents

In preparing a NOC, take note to include the following:

  1. Name of the visa applicant
  2. Length of employment with the company
  3. Role of the applicant in the company
  4. Salary of the applicant
  5. Reason for the proposed visit
  6. Duration of the proposed visit
  7. The financial commitment of the company to the trip

You can add other relevant facts to strengthen the letter, but these 7 elements are very important in a NOC.

Here is a good draft of a Letter of introduction issued by an employer.

Here is another draft if the visa applicant is going to represent his/her employer at an event:

 

Should you need any help in packaging your visa application or getting a visa, feel free to contact me on:

+234-903-000-1895 or [email protected].

Here is a list of what I can help you with

  • Consultation and confirmation that this visa is appropriate for you
  • Thorough preparation of your visa application
  • An extensive checklist of documents that you need for your visa application
  • Full review of your personal, financial & employment history
  • Careful arrangement of all correspondence with government agencies
  • Submission of your visa application to the proper government agencies
  • Expert advice on how to handle yourself at your Consular interview
  • Unlimited assistance over the phone and in person

 

If you are ready to travel;

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Feel free to ask any further question on +234-903-000-1895 or [email protected]

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You can also send in your travel stories, questions or comments below or via [email protected]

Michael Alvin is a lawyer and a UNESCO certified journalist. At Afro Tourism, he blends creativity with his training in telling moving stories about his personal experience on his various trips across Africa.

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Looking for sample of Business Introduction Letter? Here are useful tips The language of the letter should be kept formal from start to end. The opening of the .

official introduction letter sample
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